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    Davidson College
   
 
  Nov 19, 2017
 
 
    
2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Biochemistry Interdisciplinary Minor


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Biochemistry uses the principles of chemistry to explain biology at the molecular level and presents concepts fundamental to all living organisms.  The Biochemistry interdisciplinary minor enables students to study formally this intriguing and multidisciplinary field.  The interdisciplinary minor features two entry tracts, through BIO 303 or CHE 361.  These introductory courses provide a basic understanding of Biochemistry, which is then extended through a number of diverse interdisciplinary opportunities.  The interdisciplinary minor is crowned by an advanced seminar capstone course.

Requirements


The biochemistry interdisciplinary minor requires a grade of "C" or higher in six courses.  No courses counting for the interdisciplinary minor may be taken pass/fail.  Only three of these courses may count both for the interdisciplinary minor and for a student's major.  A maximum of one transfer credit may be applied to the interdisciplinary minor, if approved by the advisers.

One of the following introductory courses is required:


Application Procedure


Students interested in pursuing the Biochemistry interdisciplinary minor must contact one of the four primary faculty liaisons (Pam Hay, Jeffrey Myers, Sophia Sarafova or Nicole Snyder) to discuss the curriculum.  To apply, submit a written letter of application to one of the primary faculty liaisons, preferably no later than the last day of the spring term of the junior year.  The letter needs to specify the courses that will be used to satisfy the interdisciplinary minor requirements.  Certification of completion of all requirements is made by the Registrar following recommendation by the Biochemistry Advisory Committee.

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