Jun 23, 2024  
2023-2024 Catalog 
    
2023-2024 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
  • XPL 099 - Academic Credit for Internships


    Occasionally, organizations may require that students pursuing internships with them receive academic credit from their college. At Davidson, students who must receive academic credit for their internship are now able to receive it.

    The only students who qualify for this credit are students doing unpaid internships that require academic credit as a condition of participating in the program. The credit will be assigned as XPL 099 and, while it will appear on your transcript, will not count as one of your 32 courses required for graduation. Grading will be Pass/Fail. All course requirements must be met to pass the course.

    Please see the Matthews Career Center for important details.


Africana Studies

  
  • AFR 101 - Introduction to Africana Studies


    Instructor
    Garcia-Rojas, Green

    This course will introduce students to the value and real-world applicability of Africana Studies by examining global Black history and contemporary Black people’s experiences. It will examine the fundamental role of race in structuring the modern world by foregrounding African Diasporic people’s history, politics, and cultural productions with a particular emphasis on the Americas and the Caribbean. This course will offer an interdisciplinary, intersectional, and transnational study of Black people.  

    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

     

       

  
  • AFR 120 - Afro-Latin America (= LAS 120)


    Instructor
    Castaneda

    From Mexico to Brazil and beyond, Africans and people of African descent have fought in wars of independence, forged mixed race national identities, and contributed politically and culturally to the making of the Americas.  Even though Latin America imported ten times as many slaves as the United States, only recently have scholars begun to highlight the role blacks and other people of African descent played in Latin American history.  This course will explore the experiences of Afro-Latin Americans from slavery to the present, with a particular focus on Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia.  In doing so, the course seeks to answer questions such as: What does it mean to be black in Latin America? Why has racism persisted in Latin America despite political revolutions claiming to eliminate discrimination? What are the links between blacks in Latin America and the United States? How have differing conceptions of “race” and “nation” caused the rise and decline of transnational black alliances between U.S. blacks and Afro-Latin Americans?  All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.  

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
    Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major or minor.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 200 - Research Methods in Africana Studies


    Instructor
    Harper-Shipman

    This course will introduce students to the unique methodological questions raised by Africana studies. We will explore the methodological problems inherent in Africana studies research-what are the challenges to answering the questions raised by Africana scholars? More importantly, this course engages the different frameworks for conducting Africana scholarship that are derived from the experiences of people in the African diaspora.

    Meets the Cultural Diversity requirement

  
  • AFR 221 - Introduction to Caribbean Studies


    Instructor
    Staff

    Looking out from a Caribbean center provides a different view of the world. In this course, we complexify the Caribbean beyond sun, sea, and sand. First, we accept Caribbean scholars’ invitation to study the region across colonial and linguistic borders that erase pre-colonial/pre-Columbian history and re-center Europe. In exploring the region comparatively through time, we recognize the space as the laboratory of modernity, consequently re-situation the Caribbean within the larger story of humanity and contemporary geopolitics. Accordingly, we will engage in discussions about history vs. prehistory, colonization, racial capitalism, race, gender, and slavery, rebellions and revolutions, emancipation and independence, anti-colonial, labor and feminist movements, colorism/shadism, neoliberalism, sovereignty and postcolonialism. This course is multi-disciplinary. It covers the fields of Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology, History, Cultural Studies, Caribbean Studies, Gender Studies, Africana Studies, International Politics, and Political Science. As such, we will examine the different methodologies employed in scholarly research on the region. In addition to academic works, we will watch documentaries about politics and cultural production in the region, read first-account papers and speeches from key thinkers, listen to music, view artwork, and even cook some staples meals from the Caribbean.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies History major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Historical Thought Ways of Knowing requirement.
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 222 - Race, Policing, and Justice correct title is Policing Black Radical Aesthetics


    Instructor
    Garcia-Rojas

    This course explores the relationship among Black radical aesthetics, policing, and abolition from a philosophical perspective. It enlists Black feminist, political, and social theories and philosophies to critically examine concepts, such as aesthetics, fugitivity, black politics, policing, and justice in relation to socio-political and legal issues that fall under the umbrella of national security (criminalization, incarceration, ecologies of warfare, criminal justice reform, political protest, police militarization, and surveillance).This course will also critically think through historically pivotal moments of black protest, resistance, and triumph. 

    By studying an array of multidisciplinary and media sources through an intersectional lens, such as film, photography, poetry, performance and visual art, in addition to reading Ida B. Wells, Simone Browne, Cedric J. Robinson, Fannie Lou Hamer, Angela Davis, to name a few, this course will enable us to ask the following questions: What is the relationship between Black radical aesthetics and policing? What is policing and justice? What role does aesthetics play in Black liberation? Is Black liberation possible without abolition?

     

    Satisfies Social and Scientific Thought requirement 
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies Sociology major requirement.

     

  
  • AFR 223 - Black Freedom Dreams


    Instructor
    Garcia-Rojas

    This course explores the freedom dreams of Black political actors and thinkers alongside the carceral politics of the U.S. We will engage through a conceptual framework multiple genres and mediums (autobiographies, speeches, poetry, documentaries, film, visual art, performances, etc.) to inquire into the meaning of freedom, liberation, political resistance, and Black power. We will read the works of Robin D.G. Kelley, Angela Davis, Assata Shakur, Elaine Browne, Fannie Lou Hamer, George Jackson, Ella Baker, Martin Luther King Jr., etc., to wrestle with the question: What is a free life? We will further consider how cultural and socio-political histories, alongside factors such as race, class, gender, sexuality, impact how we envision liberation from the carceral state, as well as how it influences our understanding and dreams of freedom. This course will involve in-class participatory workshops, map-making, and other creative assignments that will enable us to give consideration to the power of imagination to radically transform the worlds we inhabit.    

     

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies English major requirement.
    Fulfills the Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    Fulfills the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • AFR 224 - Race and Campus Histories


    Instructor
    Green

    This course introduces students to the major themes, issues, and questions related to slavery and emancipation at institutions of higher education, with emphasis on Davidson University and the University of Alabama. The guiding questions: How do institutions of higher education attempt to reconcile their slave pasts and legacies for the present stakeholders? How might the current scholarship provide a pathway forward for encouraging truth and reconciliation?

    Over the course of the semester, we will read selections from Craig Wilder’s foundational work as well as newer works by Leslie Harris, Al Brophy, Lolita Buckner Inniss, and other scholars for understanding the institution of slavery and its legacy at colleges and universities.

    Students will explore this unique and often underappreciated topic of campus history, lives of the enslaved, and consequences for the postwar African American and University communities through reading foundational scholarly texts as well as newer works, participating in discussions and trips to university archives, completing short writing assignments grounded in primary and secondary sources, and a final project exploring how should universities reckon with this history and tell fuller and inclusive narratives to current and future stakeholders.

    Satisfies History major and minor credit
    Fulfills the Historical Thought requirement

  
  • AFR 225 - Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Hip Hop


    Instructor
    Staff

    Hip Hop may be one of the largest cultural movements the world has ever experienced - a cultural movement that has influenced everything from the music to which we listen, the clothes with which we adorn ourselves and to the words we speak. However Hip Hop culture is more than the music, the fashion and the style that is popular today. It transcends the commercialized products sold to mainstream U.S. America and the around globe. How so? Why did Hip Hop emerge? What does mainstream Hip Hop today represent? This course addresses these questions by tracing the historical and political context of the formation of hip hop; its expansion into a discourse of resistance; to its more mainstream contemporary global commodification.

    Hip Hop was born from racial, class and gendered divides as a way for marginalized, Black and Brown youth in the United States to share their stories and their experiences. Rooted in the struggles and voices of millions of Black and Brown youth, it served as an expression and alternative to the urban woes plaguing their lives. The early spirit of Hip Hop has been one of empowerment through artistic expression. It has enabled people to articulate the reality of their lived experiences and to share their knowledge with the world. Hip Hop through its diverse elements (B-boying/B-girling, Graffiti, DJing, MCing) is about fighting self-imposed and systemic oppression.

    By tracing the philosophies, events and actors that have contributed to Hip Hop, this course simultaneously takes up the race, class, gender and sexual politics the space espouses. We will look critically at Hip Hop today, its problems as well as its possibilities. This is not a purely musical appreciation course. However, students will have ample opportunity to engage Hip Hop lyrics, videos and images throughout the span of the course.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement for Africana Studies
    Satisfies a major requirement for Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

  
  • AFR 233 - Africana Political Economy: Anti-Blackness in Capitalist Development


    Instructor
    Harper-Shipman

    This course will examine the various ways in which people of the African diaspora have shaped and been shaped by capitalist institutions using state and global institutions. There are 3 questions that animate this course: 1. How have the experiences of people of African descent from around the world shaped and interacted with capitalism in its various stages from mercantilism through to globalization? 2. What role have political institutions from liberal democracies to authoritarian regimes played in mitigating the effects of capitalism on people of African descent? 3. Are there alternate frameworks for thinking through a generative relationship between people of African descent and capitalism? 

    Satisfies Africana Studies major Social Thought and Institutions requirement.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • AFR 235 - The 1959 Cuban Revolution (=HIS 362, =LAS 235)


    Instructor
    Staff  

    This course explores the historical underpinnings of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, U.S.-Cuban relations, and how Cubans have experienced the changes the island has undergone in the past 100 years. Particular attention is given to people of African descent who make up over a one-third of the island’s population. This Cuban narrative illuminates a variety of themes including the spread of U.S. imperialism, Cuba’s fight for sovereignty, and race relations in the Americas.  

    Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies (Geographic Region: Latin American/Caribbean).
    Satisfies a major or minor requirement in History.
    Satisfies a major or minor requirement in Latin American Studies.
    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 246 - Black Sexual Geographies


    Instructor
    Wooten

    This course will examine the social construction of Black sexuality as it relates to geography in the U.S. context and beyond, with specific emphasis on the ways in which space and place shape understandings of Black identity, culture, homemaking, belonging, self-governance, politics, and resistance. Pointedly, we will ask: how and where does Black sexuality take place and shape; what geographies foster Black sexual identity development; and what happens to our understandings of geography when we put Black sexuality at the center of analysis? Students will develop a richer understanding of how racialized sexual deviance and difference are managed through spatial terms and practices as well as the ways that Black people have (re)claimed and reimagined space and place through the analytics of sex and sexuality.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • AFR 250 - Black Women in Contemporary Performance


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course considers the ways in which Black women have operationalized performance as a site for cultural criticism and social commentary. Centering the work of artists including Josephine Baker, Katherine Dunham and others, students will investigate how the use of dance, music, song, costume and other performance elements are leveraged to both stabilize and interrupt audience assumptions about the possibilities of performance beyond entertainment or the stimulation of pleasure. The course will consider how notions of race, gender and sexuality are repeated as consistent performative acts and how these categories are crafted and expressed through the artistic choices of select Black women performers working across theatrical genres from the 1920s to the present.

    Counts as an elective in the Cultural Production & Expression category of the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region = North America).
    Counts as an elective for the Dance minor.
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 251 - Thugs, Jezebels, & Contemporary Politics


    Instructor
    Dennie

    In the months prior to the 2016 presidential election, race relations in the United States were propelled into the American public consciousness with great force, although race has continually exerted an omnipresent influence on contemporary politics. Beginning with Clarence Thomas’s 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings, this course will survey how discourse on black femininity, masculinity, sexuality, and class has impacted American politics from 1991 to the present. Topics for consideration include welfare reform, reproductive justice, mass incarceration, backlash to Barack Obama’s presidency, and white nationalist support for Donald Trump. Readings will also consider how black activists, lawyers, journalists, and politicians have responded to and resisted racism and sexism in contemporary politics.

    Fulfills a Social Thought & Institutions requirement for the Africana Studies major (Geographic region: North America).
    Fulfills a requirement in the History and Geneaologies track of the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.
     

  
  • AFR 255 - Approaches to African Art


    Instructor
    Villarroel Lamoza

    This course explores the continuities between ancient and contemporary art making traditions con-cerned with performance, ritual, sexuality, and identity in Africa. Through a broad spectrum of case studies, we will outline a historical overview of key art forms and styles starting circa 40,000 BCE- with the earliest known figurative painting found in what is now South Africa. In doing so, we will consider how far from mere representation, the arts of Africa play an active role in giving form and meaning to the world we inhabit. And in the wake of an ever-expanding environmental crisis, we will pay particular attention to the models the art of Africa can offer for us to engage with an environment that is not passive but animated and brimming with agencies.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Art major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 266 - Africa Shoots Back, in transl. (=FRE 366)


    Instructor
    Fache

    Africa Shoots Back examines West African cinema from its beginnings in the early 1960s to today.  The selection of films exposes students to new voices, perspectives and representations of Francophone West Africa from a West African perspective.  We will discuss issues of decolonization and post-colonial cultural economy, as well as analyze traditional African narrative strategies and new and unconventional images.
     

    Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Fulfills a requirement in the Film & Media Studies interdisciplinary minor.
    Counts towards the French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies requirement in Visual and Performing Arts.

  
  • AFR 270 - Racial Capitalism and Reproduction


    Instructor
    Harper-Shipman

    The course surveys reproductive health policies in the U.S. and from select African countries and their intersections with race and for-profit motives in health care. We examine  various feminist movements for reproductive autonomy and how these movements overlap with women’s struggles for improved material conditions.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement for Africana Studies
    Satisfies a major and minor requirement for Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

    Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Public Health

  
  • AFR 271 - Disease and Desire in Black Visual Cultures


    Instructor
    Villarroel Lamoza

    It is often taken for granted how the geographic distribution of suffering is mapped over the boundaries defined by gender, race, and class. Advancements in our understanding of the biological roots of disease have translated into a direct relationship between poor health and moral failures of individual nature. Yet, ailments affecting Black, Brown, female and/or gender-non-conforming bodies remain blatantly unacknowledged and under-researched. This class offers an introduction to the theory and method of visual culture to approach the vexed relationship between disease and desire. In doing so, we will explore understandings of health and healing that are deeply rooted beyond the body and in the social across the Black Atlantic.

    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Africana Studies
    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement 
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement 

     

  
  • AFR 282 - African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=ENG 282)


    Instructor
    Flanagan

    This course introduces students to some of the literature African Americans produced in the 18th and 19th centuries. Due consideration will be given to the conditions under which African American wrote, the complications attendant upon publication of their work, and the audiences to which the writings were mainly addressed. 

    Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
    Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 283 - Islands, Archipelagoes and Black Women’s Literature


    Instructor
    Gill-Sadler

    This course analyzes the intersections of gender, geography, race, and literature through a study of Black women’s writing that emanates from and explores islands and archipelagoes. The course foregrounds Black women’s archipelagic literature to, at once, contest assumptions that Black women’s literature and islands are “too insular” to speak to global questions and explore the ways in which Black women’s archipelagic literature reimagines the world all together. Course themes include, but are not limited to, colonialism, necolonialism, revolution, diaspora and sexuality.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement for elective in “Cultural Production and Expression”.
    Satisfies English major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement in all three catagories.
    Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • AFR 286 - African American Literature: 1900- (=ENG 286)


    Instructor
    Flanagan

    This course introduces students to examples of African American literature and literary criticism from the 20th to 21st centuries. Major authors from the Harlem Renaissance to the Black Arts Movement and beyond will be considered alongside theoretical formulations from critics such as Barbara Christian, Michael Awkward, and Henry Louis Gates.

    Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English Department major.
    Counts as Humanities elective in the Africana Studies major.
    Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory Interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies the Literary studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 292 - “Fake News,” Journalism and Ethics


    Instructor
    Bailey

    Students will be taught how to use journalistic skills and ethics to better harness the power empathy adds to storytelling on extremely sensitive subjects such as race, politics, gender, etc. as well as learn how to navigate the world of political punditry and the growing fake news phenomenon.  The course will focus on how the media discourse marginalizes people of color, and African Americans in particular and how rhetorical shifts can lead to non-factual news reporting.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
    Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community Requirement.


  
  • AFR 297 - Caribbean Literature (=ENG 297)


    Instructor
    Flanagan

    The Caribbean is key to any understanding of the New World. Caribbean Literature takes students beyond the islands’ popular music, food, and landscapes to an understanding of the formation of cultures from Europe, Africa, and India that have produced two Nobel Laureates. In novels such as Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea, we see how love leads to the death of a young woman in the attic in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. We’ll understand, too, why and how Aime Cesaire rewrites Shakespeare’s The Tempest to allow for the resurrection of the spirit of Caliban’s mother, Sycorax. Students do not need to know theory to take this course.  

    Students may retake this course for credit when the topic/readings change with instructor’s permission.

    Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
    Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 298 - Race and American Journalism


    Instructor
    Bailey

    We know the names Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland, and Tamir Rice. But we should also know the name Damon Kearns, a young black man born in Davidson who killed the only officer to die while on duty in the town - while being killed by the officer. This class will include an exhaustive look into the 20th anniversary of Kearns’ death as a way of exploring larger issues of race in American journalism. This loccal case study will help to illumine a myriad of lessons for young journalists and social justice warriors on the intersection of race, media, crime, and inequality in the 21st century, including many that are often misunderstood or overlooked.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
    Satisfies the Diversity requirement in the English major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • AFR 300 - Afrocubana Feminisms (=LAS 300)


    Instructor
    Staff

    Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara’s “New Man” famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to “feminize negritude and to blacken feminism.”  

    This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba’s state-sponsored women’s movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
    Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies.
    Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

  
  • AFR 300-308 - Major Thinkers in Africana Studies


    Major Thinkers in Africana Studies courses expose students to classical and foundational figures whose works have helped to shape the disciplinary debates, theoretical contours, or methodological innovations of the field.  These seminars are designed to engage larger conceptual issues in Africana Studies through the close study of the written corpus of a major thinker in the discipline.   It is a topics course in intellectual history that enables students to gain competency in primary, secondary, biographical, theoretical, and/or literary works related to a single scholarly figure in Africana Studies.  Courses will draw upon notable scholars in both the African and African Diaspora intellectual traditions. 

  
  • AFR 301 - Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Zora Neale Hurston


    Instructor
    Bowles

    Through the lens of Zora Neale Hurston’s life and work as an anthropologist, this course examines the following:  the politics of language and inequality, the perils and sanctity of segregation and the value of imagination in ethnographic writing.  Works to be examined during the course are Hurston’s biography, excerpts from her autobiography, plays, short stories, critical essays and one of her many novels.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies (Geographical Region: North America).
    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

     

  
  • AFR 302 - Black Women’s Intellectual History


    Instructor
    Green

    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of major intellectual debates and movements that have shaped the politics, history and identities of women of African descent in the United States and the African diaspora. The course will combine methodologies and concepts from multiple disciplines including, history, political theory, literature, women’s studies, sociology, psychology and philosophy.\

    Satisfies Historical Thought requirement.

  
  • AFR 303 - Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Wole Soyinka and Derek Walcott


    Instructor
    Green

    Poetics of Relation: Wole Soyinka and Derek Walcott

    Poetics of Relation will focus on the  plays, essays, and poetry authored by two recipients of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka (Nigeria) and Derek Walcott (St. Lucia). The myriad ways in which these writers have contributed to an understanding of their various communities will be at the heart of our explorations. Previous iterations of this seminar have focused on writings by Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Derek Walcott, Vidia Naipaul, Wole Soyinka, August Wilson, and James Baldwin.

    In addition to close, analytical readings,  the viewing of some of the authors’ work, substantive class discussions, oral presentations and  weekly one-two page MOUs, seminar participants will write a major critical essay or produce a project which will be added to the existing Poetics of Relations digital site.

    Satisfies the Diversity Requirement for the English major.
    Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies and Global Literary Theory.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies Literary and Cultural Representations track major requirement.
    Satisfies English major requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, eqiality and community requirement. 
    Satisfies Historical Thought requirement.
     

  
  • AFR 304 - Narratology in Bearden, Hockney, Basquiat, and Walcott’s Paintings (=ENG 415)


    Instructor

    Flanagan

    Just as painters often use their art to tell stories, paintings have served as inspiration for fiction writers such as Toni Morrison. In this course, participants will study paintings by four celebrated painters online and in local museums with two goals: First, to detect possible narratives intentionally inscribed in the works, and second, to develop their own stories from two paintings. For example, David Hockney’s “My Parents” is the artist’s rendition of his parents after three unsuccessful attempts to capture them. This painting can inspire students to tell, either in fiction or nonfiction, stories of their own or other parents. Basquiat’s “Warrior” might very well illustrate his vision of himself but it has the possibility to inspire scripts such as the one that gave us the film Black Panther. Take this class to examine the poetics embedded in paintings, and to exercise your creativity that’s inspired by some of our greatest artists.

    Cross-listed as AFR:304 in Africana Studies  for Major Thinkers credit
    Satisfies a major requirement in English.
    Satisfies the Diversity Requirement for the English major.
    Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies and Global Literary Theory.
    Satisfies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Literary and Cultural Representations track.
     

  
  • AFR 305 - Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: “Engaging the Race Question”: Cedric Robinson & Sylvia Wynter


    Instructor
    Staff

    This seminar is designed to explore the origins and transformations of the concepts of race and blackness on a global scale (beyond the U.S.) and across time (even before our modern era). More specifically, the course is designed to expose students to classical and foundational Africana Studies thinkers who offer us key historical, empirical, and theoretical frameworks to understand race and blackness in relation to other systems of domination and resistance. In particular, this seminar focuses on the works of Black Marxist historian Cedric J. Robinson and decolonial feminist scholar Sylvia Wynter. Additionally, we also discuss the production of organic and academic intellectuals who draw from these thinkers.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought Ways of Knowing requirement
    Satisfies Justice Equality and Community requirement

  
  • AFR 308 - Toni Cade Bambara


    Instructor
    Gill-Sadler

    Course Description: A self- proclaimed Pan-Africanist-socialist-feminist, cultural worker, Toni Cade Bambara has left an indelible impact on African American literature and Black feminist literary criticism. This course explores her artistic expression and political postures across various forms and genres including, but not limited to, novels, essays, short stories, and film. Through an examination of Bambara’s oeuvre, the course explores the various shifts in Black feminist thought, Black politics, and Black cultural production in the late twentieth century. 

    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major requirement.

     

  
  • AFR 309 - Consuming Culture: Food & Identity Across the Afro-Americas


    Instructor
    Castaneda

    This interdisciplinary course intends to examine an array of socio-cultural questions about Afro-Latin America and the role that food has had in constructing and imagining Afro-Latin American communities and subjectivities. By placing Afro-Latin America at the center as subjects and knowledge producers, this course commits to an intentional practice of learning from and of the Global South and decentering the United States, and the west more broadly, within the arena of political, intellectual, and cultural production. Beginning with Brazil, the country that has the largest Afro-descendent population outside of Africa and once heralded internationally as a “racial democracy,” we will examine the ways that food has served to both reinforce and disrupt socio-cultural assumptions and stereotypes related to race, gender, and class. We will examine food’s relationship to questions of gender norms, sexuality and labor and place these conceptualizations in dialogue with other countries and Afro-descendent populations across the Americas. We will end the course placing Afro-Latin America in dialogue with the Afro-Latinx diaspora and African Americans.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement
    Satisfies Latin American Studies major and minor requirement
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement

  
  • AFR 310 - The Afterlife of School Segregation (= EDU 310)


    Instructor
    Kelly

     

    This course is about the everyday ways Black students and educators suffer in schools.  Despite the end of legal segregation of schooling in the United States, Black students and educators remain racialized, dehumanized, criminalized and hypersexualized in educational spaces from hallways to classrooms to communities.  But there’s more to the story:  Black students and educators also resist, refuse, and reimagine the routine and enduring practices of schooling that cause Black suffering, melancholy and indignities in schooling.  While we will explore an Afropessimist view of schooling, we will also examine black educational fugitive spaces as spaces of radical possibility.  The course is designed as a reading seminar that prepares students to create a critical intervention that grows out of complicated conversations, personal experiences and alternative research methodologies in educational spaces

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement
    Satisfies Educational Studies minor requirement
    Meets the Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    Meets the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • AFR 321 - Special Topics: Black Lives and Black Protests in the Americas and the Caribbean


    Instructor
    Staff

    In all societies, present and historical, people have joined together to press for or against social change. In this course, we are most interested in the struggles of people who imagined and sometimes- even if only briefly- lived in ways other than those imposed violently by the “over-represented (Western bourgeois) ethnoclass human figure of Man.”  We focus on the rebellions of the survivors of the Middle Passage who challenged “the inequality of the races”  to re-define blackness and to “counteract the imperial desires for Africans’ living deaths.”  We pay special attention to these visionary thinkers and doers who made claims on how to organize human (and non-human) life on the planet, thereby re-shaping modernity or rather giving shape to alternative modernities  (and in this case, black modernities). Studying black social movements in various historical and national contexts then allows us to ultimately reflect on more general questions about the nature of political power, conflict, and legitimacy, as well as the relationship between human agency, social structure, historical change, and identity formation and politics in the modern world.

    In this course, we begin with the perspective that culture is politics and politics is culture. We depart from the theoretical frameworks that view rebellions as irrational outbursts or as strategic and rational dissent to an approach that views organized and seemingly un-organized movements of people as struggles over meaning and value. This perspective challenges traditional Marxist critiques that so-called “new” social movements are products of postmodern concerns and angsts. As such, we recognize that identity politics are underpinned by demands not only for recognition but also for the redistribution of resources and material goods. Consequently, the control and use of land and water (and air) is fundamental to these claims since we build our homes, grow our food, define our subjectivities and ways of being on land, which is surrounded by the water that nourishes our seeds, replenishes our bodies, and with which we honor our ancestors.

    During the semester, we will address the following questions: What constitutes a social movement? Why, where, and when do social movements emerge? What social or individual factors explain their development and decline? Who joins social movements? Who does not? Why? What ideas or ideals animate those who do participate? What is it like to be part of a social movement? How are social movements organized? What sorts of strategies do social movements construct and what are common goals that many movements share? What are the tactical repertoires utilized by social movements today? How do external forces such as the state, media, counter-movements, supranational institutions, and transnational corporations shape movements? What effect do they or have they had on identity, politics, power and efforts at social change? What effect do they or have they had on the organization of human life on this planet?

    This course explores the theoretical explanations for movement processes and grounds them in specific ethnographic examples of Black Atlantic social movements but also in other materials such as speeches, position papers, blogs, etc. While it attempts to transnationalize and historicize our conceptualizations of Black Atlantic rebellions, this course is nevertheless limited to works produced by Anglophone and English-speaking authors. As such, throughout the semester, I invite you to share readings with the class (as will I) by different thinkers and doers speaking or writing in the different languages and registers of the African Diaspora.

     

    Satisfies a requirement for the Africana Studies major
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • AFR 322 - Black Feminist Surveillance


    Instructor
    Garcia-Rojas

    This course introduces students to the critical role Black feminists have played in helping to shape and challenge the field of surveillance studies. In taking up questions that examine how issues of gender, race, sexuality, and class collide with state power–i.e., questions that have been largely left unexamined in surveillance studies–Black feminist artists, activists, and scholars are providing new and exciting directions for understanding surveillance as a mechanism of carceral logics, disciplinary power, and policing. They have enacted interventions that expose how surveillance technologies and practices are tied to systemic and interlocking forms of oppression, as well as how surveillance can be used in the service of resistance, self-defense, and freedom. An array of multidisciplinary sources will be explored such as film, literature, theories, and visual art. We’ll read Black feminist scholars such as, Simone Browne, bell hooks, Harriet Jacobs, June Jordan, Gloria Naylor, Patricia Hill Collins, Fannie Lou Hamer, Octavia Butler, and more.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

     

  
  • AFR 329 - Women & Slavery in the Black Atlantic


    Instructor
    Dennie

    From the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries, over 12 million Africans were shipped to the New World. Of those who survived the Middle Passage, fewer than 500,000 arrived in the United States; the vast majority were dispersed throughout the Caribbean and South America. The experiences of enslaved women, as well as the relationships between free and enslaved women, are as diverse as the African diaspora. Given the broad geographical scope of Africans’ arrivals in the New World, this course will offer a comparative examination of women and slavery in the Black Atlantic. Topics for consideration include black women’s gendered experiences of slavery, white women’s roles in slave societies, and women abolitionists. The course will also examine how African and European conceptions of gender shaped the institution of slavery in the New World. Particular attention will be devoted to slavery in West Africa, Barbados, Cuba, Brazil, and the United States.

    Fulfills an Historical and Geographical Investigations requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic region: Latin America & the Caribbean).
    Fulfills a requirement in the History major and minor.
    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • AFR 330 - Decolonizing Development in Africa


    Instructor
    Harper-Shipman

    The purpose of this course is to continue a discussion on the debates, structures, and agents that inform international development in Africa but through the varied perspectives and experiences of African women. Their perspectives offer critical interventions into development discourses and practices traditionally viewed through masculine and Western lenses. In studying development from the African woman’s perspective, one is better able to engage both the successes and failures of this formal process we call “development” in Africa. By examining African women and their relationship to this process, we will also see the alternative frames of feminisms and knowledges that emerge from these realities. The core questions driving this course are: (i) what are the various development ideologies and processes that have shaped contemporary Africa? (ii) How have African women adopted, rejected, and/or creolized these ideologies and processes for the purposes of changing their cultural, political, and economic conditions? The course readings come predominantly from African women, although there are texts from non-African women and men that generally serve to highlight the larger discourses taking place around a particular topic. 

    Satisfies Africana Studies major Social Thought and Institutions track requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • AFR 331 - African Feminisms


    Instructor
    Harper-Shipman

    In this course, we examine African feminisms as both a theoretical account and an activist praxis that considers how gendered differences are grounded in the complex realities of African women’s everyday experiences. Through explorations of how African women have used their diverse experiences to produce knowledge and challenge oppressive systems both in African and the world, writ-large, this course focuses on anti-colonial discourse, development, grassroots activism, and intellectual scholarship that advocates for gender equity and the liberation and autonomy of African people. Some of the core questions that guide this class are: what are African feminisms? What conditions created the need for different types of gendered responses from African women? How are the varied feminisms across Africa uniquely different from one another and from feminisms elaborated based on Western women? 

    Through readings that centralize the scholarship of African feminists, we explore topics such as race, gender, and sexuality, class politics, the tensions of rural-urban/ traditional-modern dichotomies in Africa, transnational feminisms, reproductive justice, sexual violence, homophobia, heteronormativity, and the historicity and cultural specificity of the subordinations that African women adopt, negotiate, and/or resist. We will examine these concerns through a critical reading of a wide range of texts-from memoir, policy case studies, ethnography, novels, essays, and cultural criticism and sociopolitical analyses.

    Satisfies Africana Sttudies major Social Thought and Institutions track requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Theory requirement, or elective requirement of Sociology major.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought Ways of Knowing requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality and Community requirement.

  
  • AFR 332 - Black Leaders of Africa and the Caribbean


    Instructor

     Harper-Shipman

    This course surveys the political ideologies and economic policies of foundational and influential leaders in the Caribbean and Africa. Breaking the regions into four historical moments (late-colonial, post-colonial; Structural adjustments, Post-Neoliberal moment), we examine policies from key political leaders in Africa and the Caribbean that supported, challenged, and/or initiated changes in the global structures of powers.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major Historical and Geographical Investigations track requirement.
    Satisfies Political Science major requirement
    Satisfies Historical Thought Ways of Knowing requirement.
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 340 - African American Intellectual History


    Instructor
    Dennie

    Since their earliest arrivals in the New World, African Americans crafted liberatory ideas as they articulated a desire for equality, justice, and self-determination. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, black intellectual thought took shape against the backdrop of processes of enslavement, emancipation, racial violence, and state-sanctioned oppression. Indeed, the discursive spaces that black political thinkers created became major sites of knowledge production and provided momentum for black mobilization. Beginning with David Walker’s Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World (1829), this course will probe landmark texts by and about African American thinkers including Maria Stewart, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, Malcolm X., and Angela Davis. Students will evaluate historical perspectives on topics including racial uplift, feminism, black nationalism, and Pan-Africanism. They will also identify major debates that shaped the development of African American intellectual history.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major Historical and Geogrpahic Investigations track requirement.

  
  • AFR 345 - Black Queer Theories


    Instructor
    Wooten

    This course will familiarize students with key texts and debates within the field of Black Queer Studies from various theoretical, literary, historical, and multi-media perspectives. As a driving question, this course asks: What is the relationship between Blackness and queerness? How have Black people theorized the two? Where do Black queer theories happen, and who gets recognized as producing them? How do we recover Black queer history? 

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Social and Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 350 - History of Southern Black Education


    Instructor
    Green

    The course explores education for African Americans in early American society to the emergence of the separate school system of the 19th and 20th centuries to current debates. Over the semester, emphasis will be placed on education for southern African Americans under slavery, emergence of the separate school system of the 19th and 20th centuries, and post-Brown vs. Board of Education decision across the region. We will pay particular attention to both historical and contemporary developments at Davidson College and the state of North Carolina.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Educational Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies History major requirement.
    Satisfies Historical Thought requirement.
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 354 - Gender, Power, Spirituality in African Aesthetics


    Instructor
    Villarroel Lamoza

    Does the gender binary (policed as if it were a biological bedrock) hold globally? This course explores how dynamic African imageries disrupt binary distinctions between feminine and masculine. In the arts and visual cultures of Africa and its diasporas, the feminine is often core to the expression and performance of political and spiritual power. Beginning in the sixteenth century, we will examine a wide range of case studies (including the Oyo, Benin, and Luba empires) and how they inform contemporary art practices across the Atlantic. 

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 355 - Black Feminist Art Practices


    Instructor
    Villarroel Lamoza

    The recent onslaughts of reproductive rights, and the rights of trans and gender non-conforming people, have irrevocably crushed our illusions of a taken-for-granted sovereignty over our own bodies. In this class, we will examine contemporary art practices from Africa and the African diaspora that explore a radical feminist self-possession, which cannot be reduced to claims of ownership, domination, and control. Interrogating how Black feminist artists have responded to the refused recognition of institutions as museum and art galleries, we will trace the ever-expanding significance of immaterial, performative, and ephemeral artworks through the twenty-first century.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies an Art major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies a Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

     

  
  • AFR 360 - History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (= LAS 360, HIS 360)


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course explores the history of the Caribbean from pre-Colombian times to the present. The goal of the class is to trace the emergence of modern Caribbean nations beginning from their status as slave colonies of the not-so-distant past within an emphasis on the central role the Caribbean islands have played in global history.  Particular emphasis is given to the maintenance of European and North American imperial enterprises and the elaboration of racial ideologies growing out of the diversity that has characterized the island populations.  Issues to be addressed include colonialism, piracy, sugar revolution, slavery and emancipation, national independence, tourism, and Caribbean migrations. Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica will be the main areas under consideration, although texts from other islands such as the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Martinique are included.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
    Satisfies a requirement in Latin American Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies a requirement in the History major or minor.
    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • AFR 364 - Black Paris


    Instructor
    Fache

    Black Paris focuses on the deep engagement of peoples of African descent with the City of Light from Fredrick Douglass to Ta-Nehisi Coates. We will examine the full variety of black cultures that have taken shape in dialogue with Paris, including poetry, prose, journals and magazines, music, and film in English and French by African American (J. Baldwin, Richard Wright, etc.) as well as Francophone Caribbean (F. Fanon, A. Césaire) and African (A. Mabanckou, Manu Dibango) artists and intellectuals.

    Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
    Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
    Satisfies a
    Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.


  
  • AFR 374 - Contemporary Race Theory (=SOC 374)


    Instructor
    Ewoodzie

    (Cross-listed with SOC 374.) Race, along with class and gender (and sexuality), continues to be one of the central themes in sociological research.  In most of the subfields of the discipline, researchers of all stripes believe race to be an explanatory variable.  This, however, does not mean that sociologists have one theory of race.  In fact, there are raging debates about exactly what they mean when they evoke the term.  In this class, we will engage with some of the most recent theories about race.  Because some of the debates are built on those of decades past, we will spend the first third of the course establishing the foundational terms of the conversations.  The second third will be organized around a handful of provocateurs.  We will read portions of their original offerings and then read responses from their critics.  The final third will focus on two topics that are proving to have significant impact on theorizing race: immigration and genomics.

     

    Satisfies a requirement in the Sociology major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographical region: North America).

  
  • AFR 383 - Black Literary Theory (=ENG 483)


    Instructor
    Staff

    (Cross-listed with ENG 483)

    This course will bring together readings both literary and critical/theoretical, beginning with Frantz Fanon’s seminal Black Skin, White Masks (1952). Taking Fanon as its point of departure, then, this course will necessarily turn to a discussion of the recent discourse on Afro-pessimism and black optimism, attempting to introduce students to important issues and questions of race, race relations, anti-black racism, black sociality, the universality of whiteness, the fungibility of the black body, and of the vulnerability and precarity of black life; and together we will think more closely about how the complex and “unthinkable” histories of slavery, colonialism, and the Middle Passage, for examples, continue to challenge the representational limits and potentialities of traditional literary genres and modes of emplotment. In addition to Fanon, authors will include Orlando Patterson, Toni Morrison, Hortense Spillers, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Jared Sexton, and Fred Moten.

    Counts as a humanities elective for the Africana Studies major.
    Counts as a senior seminar and fulfills the diversity requirement for the English major.
    Counts as a literature elective for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.


  
  • AFR 395 - Seminar in Africana Studies


    Instructor

    Harper-Shipman

     

    Seminar in advanced Africana Studies

  
  • AFR 495 - Africana Studies Capstone


    Instructor
    Staff

    Advanced Seminar in Africana Studies.

  
  • AFR 498 - Advanced Independent Study


    Africana Studies: Advanced Independent Study

  
  • AFR 499 - Honors Thesis


    Africana Studies: Honors Thesis

  
  • ART 355 - Black Feminist Art Practices


    Instructor
    Villarroel Lamoza

    A study of the artistic practices of Black feminists throughout the African diaspora.


Anthropology

  
  • ANT 101 - Intro Cultural Anthropology


    Instructor
    Shuman

    Cross-cultural study of systems of knowledge and belief, social and political institutions, economic behavior, and human ecological adaptation. Anthropological approaches to traditional tribal and peasant societies as well as complex contemporary societies.

    Required course for the major in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement for the minor in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Fall and Spring)

  
  • ANT 102 - Human Evolution


    Instructor
    Staff

    Introduction to humanity’s biological heritage. Topics include introductory evolutionary theory, population genetics, primate biology and behavior, and the primate fossil record. Principal emphasis upon the fossil evidence for human evolution, with particular focus on biological adaptations and the emergence of culture.

    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    .

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Offered in alternating years.

  
  • ANT 108 - Introduction to Archaeology


    Instructor
    Cormier

    Introduction to how archaeologists reconstruct the past. Methods of dating, artifact analysis, excavation, and interpretation, using examples drawn from prehistory. Contributions of archaeology to anthropology, as well as the use of other disciplines by archaeologists.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Fall; offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 206 - Asian America, Asian Diaspora


    Instructor
    Lozada

    This course explores the complex historical and cultural processes that form Asian American communities in the U.S. Students will learn about the constellation of push and pull factors impacting who migrates to the U.S. from Asia and the Pacific Rim, and the specific ways in which Asian American lives are affected by race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation and religion.

    Satisfies Anthroplogy major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Chinese studies minor requirement.
    Satisfies East Asian Studies minor requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

     

  
  • ANT 208 - Early Cities and States


    Instructor
    Staff

    Archaeology of prehistoric and early historic complex societies. Early chiefdoms and states of South America, Egypt, and Asia. Anthropological theories of state formation, including the roles of ecology, ideology, technology, warfare, and economic organization.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 211 - Jews, Race, and Religion


    Instructor
    Shuman 

     

    What is the relationship between anti-Semitism and Islamophobia? How does the hatred of Jews and Judaism link up with or depart from the hatred of Muslims and Islam? One issue shared by these ideologies of hatred is that religious beliefs and practices are rendered as similar to essentialized notions of biological difference. This course will draw on a variety of readings and viewpoints to examine and assess the character, content, and impacts of these ideologies, noting their similarities and differences, while also engaging their direct or indirect relation to Jewish-Muslim/Jewish-Arab relations, both positive and negative.

     

    Satisfies the major and minor in Anthropology

    Satisfies the interdisciplinary minor requirement in Middle East Studies

    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement

    Satisfies the social-scientific thought requirement

  
  • ANT 220 - Religion, Society, and Culture


    Instructor 
    Samson

    Social and cross-cultural aspects of religious belief and practice in local and global context.  Special emphasis on ritual behavior and collective identity in ethnographic perspective, religious revitalization, new religious groups, and the shifting global religious landscape.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Fall; offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 227 - Environmental Justice in Latin America


    Instructor
    Samson

    This course addresses human-environment relations in Latin America from the standpoint of environmental history and ethnographic case studies in the region. Issues such as biodiversity, land use and agriculture, transnational flows of natural and food resources, ethnoecology, and social mobilization around environmental issues are examined using theoretical perspectives from cultural and political ecology.  Particular attention is given to the relationship between indigenous peoples and the environment and to alternative models of “development” in Mesoamerica, the Andes, and Brazil.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
    Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Spring; offered alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 231 - Health and Healing in Ghana


    Instructor
    Bowles

    Sickness in Ghana has traditionally been viewed as an illness that affects a person’s entire being, including the spiritual and the supernatural realms. It takes more than just treatment of physical systems to restore health.  In Ghana, herbal medicine remains a prevalent method of health care, and the World Health Organization estimates that at least 60% of Ghanaians rely on herbal medicines.   A traditional healer, defined as a person who is recognized by his/her community as a competent healthcare provider, uses herbs, animal as well as mineral substances for patient care. Traditional methods are based on social, cultural, and religious principles, including knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding the physical, mental and social well-being a community. 

    Although biomedicine is the most popular medical system in the world due to globalization and Western hegemony, this experiential learning course introduces students to an array of conceptualizations of health, wellness, and illness in the Ghanaian context as well as the epidemiology of diseases that are prevalent in Ghana. Through lectures, discussions and shadowing, this course explores the socioeconomic and political ecological factors in the prevalence of diseases like malaria, typhoid, and yellow fever, health policy and implementation within biomedical settings, and traditional Ghanaian healing practices such as bone setting, plant-based medicines and sorcery/shamanism and its illness etiologies, and diagnostic and treatment methodologies. Faculty at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Technology and Science (KNUST) will also discuss case studies on traditional practices, allied health, and the challenges and efficacy of both biomedical and traditional medicines in Ghana.

     

    Satisfies major requirements in Anthropology, Africana Studies as well as Public Health (discussed in consultation with Patrick Baron).

    Counts as 200-level elective requirements for Anthropology and the Social Thought and Institutions category of the Africana major

    Satisfies elective requirement for Anthropology minor.

    Satisfies elective requirement for the Public Health Interdisciplinary minor.

    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is part of the summer Davidson in Ghana Program.

  
  • ANT 232 - Contemporary Ghana


    Instructor
    Staff

    Examination of Ghanaian family structure, gender roles, religious beliefs, social stratification, political economy, and inter-ethnic relations. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the legacy of colonialism and efforts to develop a national culture.

    Fulfills a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Fufills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Offered in alternating years as part of the Davidson in Ghana summer program.

  
  • ANT 233 - Performance in West Africa


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course will examine performance aesthetics and traditions from various West African Cultures and contexts.  Special consideration will be given to how these approaches to music and dance shape in particular inform the diasporic cultural practices of Afro-descended people in the US and Caribbean.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Anthropology major and minor.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement

  
  • ANT 234 - Urban Africa/Popular Culture


    Instructor
    Bowles

    Though ethnographic texts, this course explores the intersections of gender, ethnicity and class in African societies in the 20th and 21st centuries. This course also examines representations of Africa within the nation-state and transnationally. Topics of discussion include tourism, national identity and ethnicity, popular culture, the dichotomies of urban and rural Africa and the cultural politics of development and the state.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satifies a cultural production and expressions requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • ANT 235 - Debunking Race


    Instructor
    Cho

    Examines the concept of race from a biocultural perspective, deconstructing race by exploring evidence from population genetics and human origins. Contemporary racial issues such as classification of racial/ethnic groups, and evaluating intelligence and achievement on the basis of race/ethnicity are explored.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought  requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Spring; offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 237 - Commodities and Capitalism


    Instructor
    Staff

    In their travel across varied social settings, commodities mediate social relationships, adorn daily life, and are imbued with meanings that emerge from - and exceed - capitalist logics. In other words, commodities make worlds, capitalist and more-than-capitalist. This course will introduce students to multiple ways of understanding and studying commodities, largely through examination of ethnographic work on how commodities are produced, mobilized and regarded. Topics addressed may include how commodification relates to nature, labor, bodies, consumption, culture, money, gifts and other matters.

     

    Satisfies a requirement for the Anthropology major and minor
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • ANT 238 - Global Masculinities


    Instructor
    Shuman

    An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Men’s Studies based on texts from anthropology, sociology, and film and cultural studies. This course will spotlight the diversity of men’s lives across the globe, by focusing on various masculinities, including “nerds,” “jocks,” “gay men,” “drag queens,” “butch lesbians,” “trans-men,” and “soldiers.” In so doing, it will highlight how masculinity intersects with race, class, age, language, sexuality, religion, and nationality to create various models of hegemonic and subordinate masculinities that co-exist and compete with one another within a global capitalist system of homosocial bonding and rivalry.

    Counts as a 200-level elective in the Anthropology major and minor.
    Counts in the Society and Politics track of the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

     

  
  • ANT 241 - Disability and Difference


    Instructor
    Cormier

    Like gender and race, disability is a cultural and social formation that identifies particular bodies and minds as different, regularly as undesirable, and rarely as extraordinary. This course uses a biocultural lens to explore the lived experiences of persons with disabilities across time and within different social contexts. Through a discussion of scholarly readings, literature, film, photography, art, and archaeology, this course considers disability in relation to: health; identity; impairment; stigma; monstrosity; marginalization; discrimination; beauty; power; media representations; activism; intersectionality; race; and gender and sexuality.

    Satisfies Anthropology major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • ANT 253 - Latin Amer Soc & Cult Today


    Instructor
    Samson, Sturtevant

    Overview of Latin American culture from an anthropological perspective.  An ethnographic focus demonstrates linkages between life in local communities and forces of cultural, social, and political change at the level of the nation-state.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies one of the introductory course requirements in Latin American Studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 257 - African Roots, American Soils


    Instructor
    Bowles

    This course introduces the African Diaspora as a theoretical framework within anthropology for investigation of the dispersal of people of African descent throughout the world. This course examines African cultural influences that inform a diaspora connected through migrations, both voluntary and involuntary, as well as colonization and the globalization of capitalism. Topics of discussion include the cultural production of blackness, roots tourism, resistance to oppression, revolutions, rebellions and maroon communities.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • ANT 263 - Resistances, Rebellions, Revolutions


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course examines issues in social activism from both a theoretical and ethnographic perspective. How do social activists think about and make social change happen? By examining theories and issues in social justice, from macro-level issues in the international arena to local mobilization for community issues, this course will introduce students to social movement and civil society theory. This course will study social movements, community activism, and the cultural practices of community groups.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • ANT 265 - China Today


    Instructor
    Lozada

    Examines Chinese society from the bottom up, with an emphasis on the structure of everyday life. The periods under examination include pre-revolutionary China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong), socialist China, and post-socialist China. Topics include marriage and reproductive strategies, lineage organization, inheritance patterns, gender roles, and religion and life cycle rituals.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 271 - Human Ecology


    Instructor
    Cormier

    Human biological variation among and within living populations. Evolutionary, genetic, ecological, demographic, and especially cultural factors that contribute to biological variation are explored. Topics include biological adaptations to hot/cold climates, high altitudes, and lactose intolerance, among others.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 272 - Forensic Anthropology


    Instructor
    Cho

    The application of the techniques used in biological anthropology to the law. Various topics and methodologies related to the identification of human skeletal remains, including the excavation of human remains, estimation of age-at-death and sex, trauma analysis, cause and manner of death, and mass disasters are introduced.


    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Offered in alternating years.

  
  • ANT 273 - Bioarchaeology


    Instructor
    Cho

    The study of human and non-human remains from archaeological sites to reconstruct past human behavior and biology, and their environmental and cultural conditions. Topics include human skeletal indicators of diet, activity level, and disease, and faunal skeletal indicators of ancient human behavior, such as hunting and paleoecology.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
    Satisfies depth (not breadth) course requirement in the Natural Science and Social Science tracks of the Environment Studies major.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Spring; offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 275 - Monkeys, Apes, Humans


    Instructor
    Cho

    We examine the extant species in the primate order, our closest living relatives, from evolutionary and ecological perspectives to better understand humankind and the evolution of human characteristics such as bipedality, large brains, concealed ovulation, and extensive culture. Diverse anatomy and social behaviors of non-human primates such as foraging strategies, mating systems, sexual dimorphism, intelligence, and communication are addressed.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 277 - Ancient Diet and Disease


    Instructor
    Cormier

    This course studies how premodern societies acquired, prepared, served, exchanged, and consumed their food. By exploring archaeological, paleoenvironmental, and (ethno-)historical sources, students will learn about hunting and gathering, the emergence of horticulture, intensive agricultural practices, food preparation, storage, and transportation technologies. In addition, students will learn about the economic, political, and ideological roles played by food in the archaeological past. This course does not focus on a world area or time-period, but rather covers cultures from across five continents and dating from ca. 10,000 BCE to 1,500 CE.

    Satisfies Anthropology major and minor requirement
    Satisfies Environmental Studies major and minor, Social Sciences track
    Satisfies Historical Thought requirement
    Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement

  
  • ANT 283 - Folklore


    Instructor
    Samson

    Introduction to the study of folklore as an aspect of culture, as a symbolic expression of the identity, values, and beliefs of a group of people.  Themes include the formation of folk groups and the nature of tradition and how traditions are created and changed.  Emphasis on social groups in the United States and themes from Latin America.  Field project in collecting folk material.

  
  • ANT 301 - Critical Thinkers: Zora Neale Hurston


    Instructor
    Bowles

    Through the lens of Zora Neale Hurston’s life and work as an anthropologist, this course examines the following:  the politics of language and inequality, the perils and sanctity of segregation and the value of imagination in ethnographic writing.  Works to be examined during the course are Hurston’s biography, excerpts from her autobiography, plays, short stories, critical essays and one of her many novels.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies (Geographical Region: North America).
    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • ANT 305 - Racism


    Instructor
    Bowles

    This course examines racism through socio-cultural perspectives on colonization, decolonization, global capitalism, and white supremacy. Drawing on anthropological approaches to systemic and institutional racism, this course helps students to understand how indigenous and marginalized people in various regions of the world experience and resist racialized oppression. 

    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 310 - Politics, Society, and Culture


    Instructor
    Shuman

    Examines authority, organization, power, and legitimization of authority using a comparative perspective. Community-based learning model facilitates exploration of environmental justice and grassroots change with an emphasis on the symbolic aspects of power, structural inequity, and social movements.

    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies Communication Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 321 - Borderlands, Identity, and Rights


    Instructor

    Samson

    Advanced study of how borders and borderland regions shape social, religious, political, and economic relationships in Latin America, and examination of the tensions created when people and resources cross cultural and political borders. Particular emphasis on Mexico and Central America, as well as the Latino experience in the United States.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • ANT 323 - Human Rights in Latin America


    Instructor
    Samson

    Anthropological perspectives on human rights agendas in Latin America. Case studies examine the tension between universal and culturally relative conceptions of human rights in relation to issues such as state violence, violence directed toward minorities, and social justice movements.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
    Satisfies major & minor elective credit in Latin American Studies.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Fall; offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 325 - Environment, Economy, & Culture


    Instructor
    Samson

    Cultural perspectives on human-environment relations and linkages between the environment and the global economy. Special emphasis on the integration of current knowledge in ecological anthropology, economic production, and the impact of human activity on the environment. Environmental justice issues and proposals for sustainable development are included.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Social-Scientific requirement.

    Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 327 - Latin American Religions in Practice


    Instructor
    Samson

    The emphasis in this course is on the contemporary religious pluralism that has resulted from the encounter of the Old World with the New. Religious change in Latin America since Vatican II and the advent of liberation theology is examined alongside the burgeoning presence of Protestantism in the region during the last quarter of the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to indigenous and Afro-Latin American traditions. Case studies in the course are selected for their use of ethnographic methods, and the geographic focus centers on the Andean region, Mesoamerica, Brazil, and the Caribbean.


    Satisfies the Ethics, Theology, Politics, Society requirement of the Religious Studies major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major.
    Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives requirement.

  
  • ANT 340 - Medical Anthropology


    Instructor
    Staff
    Cross-cultural study of belief systems concerning health and illness, practices of diagnosis and treatment, and roles of patients and practitioners. Western biomedicine and non-Western health care systems are examined. The interaction of ecological and cultural factors that influence disease manifestations, and the bio-cultural context of sickness and therapy are explored.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Offered in alternating years.

    Optional week-long trip to Guatemala during Spring Break

  
  • ANT 343 - Feminist Anthropology


    Instructor
    Bowles

    Explores how gender ideologies shape the exercise of power upon men and women in different societies and cultures. Topics include the construction of masculinity and femininity, commodification and consumption of gender, social position, agency, and the political economy of gender. Emphasis on developing an understanding of different theoretical perspectives in the cross-cultural study of gender.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.
    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 355 - Archaeology of Politics


    Instructor
    Staff

    This seminar focuses on the political organization of a diverse set of premodern cultures. Course themes include egalitarianism, social complexity, hierarchy, political institutions, governments, and political economy. Students will learn about different world cultures with distinct political organizations, focusing on archaeological data like architecture, settlement, portable technology, art, written documents, and burials. Through ancient politics, students will also explore archaeological topics such as trade and commerce, warfare, religion, migrations, environments, political collapse, and ethics. This course will help students understand the contemporary world thanks to broadening their appreciation of political possibilities.

    Satisfies Anthropology major and minor requirement
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • ANT 360 - Anthropology of Development and Environmental Sustainability


    Instructor
    Samson

    Issues of development and sustainability from the standpoint of environmental anthropology and anthropological approaches to development theory. Considers the human face of development, including local and global scales of analysis, environmental justice, and discourses of community sustainability.

    Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 370 - Theory in Anthropology


    Instructor
    Shuman

    Theoretical and interpretive perspectives in modern cultural anthropology. Issues include functionalism, historical analysis, cultural evolution, ecology, cultural materialism, structuralism, and symbolic analysis. Writings of major thinkers, including Radcliffe-Brown, Harris, Levi-Strauss, Douglas, Geertz, Turner, Godelier, and Sahlins.

    One of the courses satisfying the Theory requirement for the major in Anthropology.

    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ANT 101 or permission of the instructor. (Fall)

  
  • ANT 371 - Ethnographic Research and Writing


    Instructor
    Staff

    Approaches to ethnographic and ethnohistorical research and analysis in cultural anthropology. Examination of selected studies that demonstrate a variety of approaches to the study of single cultures and to cross-cultural comparisons. Students design and complete research projects. With advance departmental approval, an off-campus ethnographic field school course may be substituted for credit toward the major.

    One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ANT 101 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

  
  • ANT 372 - Visual Anthropology


    Instructor
    Bowles

    Introduction to the theories and methods necessary for making ethnographic films. Students will conduct fieldwork and make a documentary film on a particular aspect of social and cultural behavior. Emphasis is placed on developing the critical skills needed for resolving some of the ethical, technical, and aesthetic problems that may emerge during the documentation of social and cultural behavior.

    One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary major and minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 373 - Decolonizing Anthropology Theory


    Instructor
    Bowles

    This course examines the theoretical and interpretive perspectives of contemporary anthropologists outside of the US and Europe. Disciplinary issues such as the “crises of representation” alongside the decolonization of the Global South will be explored. Writings that explore the tensions between the universal and particular, theory and practice, power and knowledge and the limits of objectivity and subjectivity will also be discussed.

    One of the courses satisfying the Theory requirement for the major in Anthropology.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ANT 101 or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ANT 374 - Methods in Forensic Anthropology


    Instructor
    Cho

    This course concerns forensic taphonomy, the study of postmortem and postdepositional processes that occur in human and non-human animals in the medicolegal context. Students will design research projects on the decomposition process in piglets, and learn to collect, analyze, interpret, and present data.

    One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 375 - Human Osteology


    Instructor
    Cormier

    Identification of bones in the human skeleton and basic skeletal biology. Osteological methods and analyses applicable to bioarchaelogy and forensic anthropology are introduced.

    One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

    Counts as an elective for the Biology major.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Spring; offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 376 - Comparative Skeletal Anatomy and Function


    Inxtructor
    Cho

    A comparative study of animals in various taxa, including humans, and the reconstruction of diet, locomotion, and evolutionary history from skeletal anatomy. Applications in paleoanthropology, primatology, zoology, and biomechanics.

    One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

    Counts as an elective for the Biology major.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Offered in alternating years.

  
  • ANT 377 - Imaging the Earth


    Instructor
    Staff

    The use of geographical information systems (GIS) to analyze, model, and present spatial relationships in the biological and social sciences, supplemented by other packages such as Google Earth. Field collection of spatial data with GPS units. Course is computer-based and emphasizes individual research projects.

    Satisfies the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.
    Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies Environmental Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered in alternating years.)

  
  • ANT 380-9 - Seminars in Anthropology


    Instructor
    Staff

    One-time seminars in selected topics in anthropology. Topics announced in advance.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Anthropology
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Not open to first-year students.

 

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