Jun 18, 2024  
2023-2024 Catalog 
    
2023-2024 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
  • FRE 352 - Queer(ing) Québec


    Instructor
    Robu

    This course will focus on the formation and the representation of LGBTQIA2S+ epistemologies and identities in Québec. Students will explore literary and cinematographic accounts of queerness and will be introduced to key themes and critical frameworks through theoretical readings. This will give them a historical and cultural understanding of the Québec’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, and Two-Spirit + scene. Taking an interdisciplinary approach and an intersectional perspective, in this class we will look at diverse expressions of sexuality, LGBTQIA2S+ activism, and community, while giving students a comprehensive and broad understanding of the many forms of Queer(ing) Québec. Assignments will include weekly response postings, analytical papers, and oral presentation. Readings, films, discussions, and assignments are all in French.

    Satisfies French and Francophone Studies major and minor requirement. 
    Satisfies Global Literary Theory major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • FRE 359 - Haiti Through Film


    Instructor
    Mohammed

    Haiti fascinates as much as it perplexes. Stunning the society at the time with its successful slave revolt to become the first black Republic in the New World in 1804, Haiti is now viewed as the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere riddled with political instability, social injustices, and underdevelopment. Yet it boasts a diverse and dynamic cultural heritage expressed through various artistic media. This course introduces students to major events and conflicts (Haitian Revolution, dictatorships in the 20th century, US interventions, and the 2010 earthquake) that have shaped Haitian history, politics, society, and culture, and analyzes them for the ways in which they contribute to the creation of Haitian cinematic traditions. Filmmakers include Noland Walker, Raoul Peck, Jonathan Demme, Arnold Antonin, and Maya Deren. Coursework will be done in French. All films will be subtitled in English.

    Satisfies French and Francophone Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 
    Satisfies Justice, Equality and Community requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students who have completed 220 or above must enroll in FRE 359. 

  
  • FRE 360 - Québec Through Film


    Instructor
    Kruger

    An introduction to contemporary Québec society as portrayed in film, with a focus on questions of individual and collective identities.  Students will develop critical skills as readers of film as they examine feature films, documentaries, and animated short subjects.  Typical directors include Arcand, Dolan, Jutra, Pool and Vallée. 

    Satisfies a requirement in French and Francophone Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies requirement in Visual and Performing Arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FRE 201 or FRE 212.
    FRE 360 is dual-listed with FRE 230.  Students who have completed FRE 220 or above must enroll in FRE 360.

  
  • FRE 362 - Gender and Sexuality in Maghreb


    Instructor
    Postoli

    This course will explore texts, films, and issues related to gender and sexuality in the Maghreb. We will therefore be looking at literary, critical, and cinematographic from Francophone Algerian, Moroccan, and Tunisian writers and directors. Our goal will be to understand how gender and sexuality are conceived of and represented, and how they operate in these societies across different periods. At the same time, we will consider salient socio-cultural, historical, religious, and political factors in order to better understand their dynamic with questions of gender and sexuality. Readings will come from the works of writers such as Tahar Ben Jelloun, Kamel Daoud, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Leïla Sebbar, Leïla Slimani, etc.; and films will be selected from Francophone North African movies of the last three decades.

    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.
    Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric Ways of Knowing requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Any course numbered French 220 or above.

  
  • FRE 363 - Québec: Literature, Society, and Culture


    Instructor
    Kruger

    Study of questions concerning Québec society. Focus on texts, events, and movements that have shaped this dynamic and diverse French-speaking society. Typical authors include Poulin, Hébert, Proulx, Chen, Micone, Lalonde, and Hémon.

    Satisfies requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite- Any course numbered French 220 or above.

    Note- For Spring 2022
    This course includes an optional DRI group investigation project in Montreal and Quebec City in May.

  
  • FRE 364 - Paris Noir


    Instructor
    Fache

    This course examines the lives and works of artists and intellectuals from Africa, the African Diaspora and the US in Paris (1920-1960).


    Satisfies a requirement in French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies ae requirement in Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America). 
    Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FRE 212 Oral Expression or FRE 222 Introduction to Literature or FRE 260 Contemporary France

  
  • FRE 366 - Africa Shoots Back (=AFR 266)


    Instructor
    Fache

    Africa Shoots Back examines West African cinema from its beginnings in the early 1960s to today.  The selection of films exposes students to new voices, perspectives and representations of Francophone West Africa from a West African perspective.  We will discuss issues of decolonization and post-colonial cultural economy, as well as analyze traditional African narrative strategies and new and unconventional images.

    Counts towards the French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
    Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Fulfills a requirement in the Film & Media Studies interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies requirement in Visual and Performing Arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FRE 220

  
  • FRE 368 - France and Métissage


    Instructor
    Fache

    Course explores the concept of métissage in the contemporary French literary context.

    Fulfills a requirement in the French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
    Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
    Fulfills a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Any course numbered 220 or above.

  
  • FRE 369 - Contemporary African Women Writers


    Instructor
    Stern

    An active, project-based course, organized around different cities of the francophone world: Dakar, Montreal, Paris, Algiers. Through cultural events, newspapers, music, film, and literary texts from each city, students will produce cultural critiques for our course site, in written, video and audio formats.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Any course numbered French 220 or above.

  
  • FRE 371 - Memorializing Decolonization: Focus on the Algerian War


    Instructor
    Muzart

    On the 60th anniversary of the Algerian independence, this course will give particular attention to key French-language cultural contributions that participated in the representation and memorialization of the decolonization process in Algeria. As the largest settlement of the French colonial empire and the stage of a brutal and traumatic war, Algeria constitutes a microcosm of choice to examine the historical and political impact of colonization in the past and in the current Francophone World. By comparing works produced during the war and its aftermath with more recent ones, students will engage in contrapuntal dialogues that reveal the multifaceted aspects of memory about the Algerian revolution. In addition to reflections on the use of particular creative genres, such as novels, comic books, films, poems, or paintings, students will explore this historical event from diverse critical frameworks, including ecology, gender, race, and sexuality.

    Satisfies a major requirement in French and Francophone Studies
    Satisfies a minor requirement in French and Francophone Studies
    Satisfies the Literary Thought, Creative Writing, & Rhetoric requirement
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FRE 220

  
  • FRE 379 - Frantz Fanon [=AFR 306]


    Instructor
    Irele

    Frantz Fanon is considered one of the most influential postcolonial thinkers of the twentieth century. This course will serve as an introduction to the theorist, focusing on his Black Skin, White Masks and Wretched of the Earth. Employing primarily close reading, this course will engage students in examination of the evolution of Fanon’s ideologies and the connections between his work and relevant social movements. This is a seminar course and students will be required to participate actively in discussion. Students may read the texts in French or English.

    Satisfies requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric

  
  • FRE 389 - European Union Politics


    Courses on topics related to francophone civilization (e.g., culture, history, politics) taken at a university in a French-speaking country.

    European Union Politics counts an an elective for the Political Science major.

     

  
  • FRE 390 - Studies in Civilization and Culture Abroad


    Courses on topics related to francophone civilization (e.g., culture, history, politics) taken at a university in a French-speaking country.

  
  • FRE 391 - France Noire


    Instructor
    Kruger

    France Noire is a course that provides an overview of France’s socio-historical relationship to Blackness within its borders and with migrants of African descent. Starting with colonial history and the exploitation of Africa and the post-colonial era, we study France’s complicated and problematic relationship to the concept of race, and to Blackness more specifically. The students in the course will gain knowledge and a critical understanding of how France has dealt with its Black population and what the current racial landscape looks like. While conservative factions argue for the preservation of France’s old social fabric, the course pays particular attention to the contributions of Black artists, politicians, and activists to the country’s well-being and development, and to the work of Black and anti-racist scholars and activists who bring to light the inequalities rooted in the Hexagon’s structural racism.

    Because the course is taught in situ, students will have the unique opportunity to visit sites that play a critical role in France’s racial history, and will also have access to resources that are dedicated to issues discussed in the course.

    Assignments are designed to impart historical knowledge of France’s racial and colonial history and to develop critical analysis of primary sources produced by artists, writers, and intellectuals of African descent. They include short analytical papers, a presentation, a midterm exam, and a final research project.

     

  
  • FRE 395 - Independent Study for Majors


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independenty Study for Majors

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • FRE 395, 396, 397 - Independent Study for Majors


    Individual work under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of study and determines the means of evaluation. 

  
  • FRE 399 - Topics in Francophone Literature


    Instructor
    Beschea

    Topics in Francophone Literature

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric requirement
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

  
  • FRE 490 - Senior Seminar


    Instructor
    Postoli

    Required of all senior majors in the fall semester.

    Fall 2021

    The focus of this seminar is the body. We will therefore be looking at numerous considerations of the body in French and Francophone works across times and geographic boundaries. When reading or watching our primary works, students will consider a variety of factors, including social, cultural, and historical circumstances at play, but also political and aesthetic ones. The political will become particularly salient in works where power structures such as the State, the Church, or patriarchy are implicated.

  
  • FRE 491 - Senior Capstone


    Instructor
    C. Fache

    Required of all senior majors in the spring semester, except those students enrolling in 499 Senior Honors Thesis.

  
  • FRE 495 - Independent Study


    Coming Soon!

  
  • FRE 496 - Independent Study


    Coming Soon!

  
  • FRE 499 - Senior Thesis/Project


    Instructor

    C. Fache

     

    Seniors who satisfy requirements for admission to the departmental honors program enroll in 499. A written request containing a brief description of the thesis project and a working bibliography is submitted to the department for consideration no later than the fifth week of the fall semester of the senior year. Approval of project proposal constitutes permission to enroll in 499. An oral defense of the thesis is required.

  
  • GSS 352 - Gender and Sexuality in North Africa


    Instructor
    Postoli

    This course will explore texts, films, and issues related to gender and sexuality in the Maghreb. We will therefore be looking at literary, critical, and cinematographic from Francophone Algerian, Moroccan, and Tunisian writers and directors. Our goal will be to understand how gender and sexuality are conceived of and represented, and how they operate in these societies across different periods. At the same time, we will consider salient socio-cultural, historical, religious, and political factors in order to better understand their dynamic with questions of gender and sexuality. Readings will come from the works of writers such as Tahar Ben Jelloun, Kamel Daoud, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Leïla Sebbar, Leïla Slimani, etc.; and films will be selected from Francophone North African movies of the last three decades.

    Note: This course was previously taught as FRE 362 and is offered in English.

     

    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.
    Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric Ways of Knowing requirement.


Gender and Sexuality Studies

  
  • GSS 101 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    This class provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analytical tools, key scholarly debates, history, and research subfields of gender and sexuality studies. It pays particular attention to the construction and deployment of gender as a cultural category across various social institutions. Students will learn to assess and analyze documents pertaining to the history of and contemporary state of feminisms and women’s rights, masculinity, queer theory, disability studies, body image and consumer culture, intersectionality, as well as a host of gendered questions related to health, work, the family, violence, and politics.


    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 190 - Understanding Leadership through the Female Marvel Universe


    Instructor
    Simpson

    The legends, villains, and superpowers of the Marvel universe have captured the world’s attention for decades. However, while female characters are evident throughout Marvel’s history, our attention has only come to women as leaders within the Marvel universe in recent years. This course will give leaders like Black Widow, The Wasp, Shuri, Kamala Khan, She Hulk, and countless other Marvel women the attention they deserve through a critical analysis of their origin stories, leadership characteristics, and contributions to the Marvel universe. We will examine historical, social, and cultural paradigms of leadership, gender constructs within leadership roles, and leadership patterns and behaviors - not only related to cinematic, television and print portrayals of female Marvel characters, but in our own lives and society as well. We will also analyze the representation of women, how female leadership is framed, and marginalization and exclusion of women in leadership roles throughout comic book, film, and television portrayals of the Marvel universe. Selected texts, Marvel-based television shows, and Marvel movies will enhance learning in this course.

    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement

  
  • GSS 201 - Feminist and Queer Theories


    Instructor

    Horowitz

    This class explores the epistemological and theoretical foundations of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Students will become familiarized with the different theoretical traditions that inform contemporary gender analysis, and examine scholarly definitions of gender and sexuality. We discuss the means by which gender and sexuality are produced and reproduced at the individual and institutional levels, their intersection with other dimensions of social difference, as well as various related approaches to and interpretations of equality, justice, and freedom.

    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 220 - Topics in Queer Studies


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course provides an introduction to the field of queer studies by way of a specialized topic. Course content and emphasis will vary with instructor, but sample topics include queer theories, queer of color critiques, queer popular culture, transgender studies, and queer activism.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies - content course for society and politics of trade.
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies-elective.
     

     

  
  • GSS 292 - Queer Russia (=RUS 292)


    Instructor
    Utkin

    Russia is accustomed to playing the role of the “evil empire.” The current ongoing war in Ukraine has resurrected the Cold War-era narratives about Russia as a dark, aggressive, and ruthless military power. The notorious legislation of recent years-whose functions range from barring Americans from adopting Russian orphans to criminalizing the so-called “gay propaganda”-have further solidified Russia’s reputation as a country with little regard for human rights. Yet generations of Russian poets, artists, and writers have transformed the country’s systematic oppression and violence into spectacular forms of protest and self-expression. This course focuses on gender and sexuality in exploring an alternative cultural history of Russia, which highlights its queer legacy from the nineteenth century to the present. We will examine poetry, fiction, art, memoirs, plays, films, performances, and discursive texts that showcase uniquely Russian conceptions of marriage, gender relations, gender expression, and sexual identity. Attention will be paid to the ways in which Russian and Western narratives of queerness align and diverge. In English. No knowledge of Russian is required or expected.

    Satisfies major and minor requirements in Russian Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
    Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric requirement.

  
  • GSS 321 - Sex Outside the City


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    Since the early 1990s, many queer theorists have reasserted the centrality of western cities to the formation of queer subjectivities. But more recent scholarship has challenged this assumption, suggesting that not only have LGBTQ identities historically developed in suburban, rural, and non-western locales, but that the dominant urban narrative reinforces white, upper-class maleness as the norm of queer life. This course examines the ways in which space is queered and queerness emerges in response to metropolitan, non-metropolitan, Western, and non-Western space. We will examine the queer convergence of the public and the private, the processes by which space is simultaneously raced and gendered, the relationship between sexuality and built environments, and the role of capitalism and neoliberalism in producing queer individuals and networks.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies -Histories and Geneologies Track.
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies - elective.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • GSS 322 - Black Queer South


    Staff

    Whether it’s Black Gay Pride Atlanta or DC, or activists like black trans femme organizer Micky Bradford, the Black Queer South has always had something to say about race, gender, class, and sexual struggle and liberation. However, southern black queer (or LGBT) culture is frequently overlooked, understudied, and/or misrepresented. Thus, this course will employ the geographical place and conceptual space of “the South” as an entry point for exploring black queer possibilities from “the bottom.” [This course will meet the major’s Sexuality Studies Requirement and will be in the Society & Politics track.]

    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 324 - Sex, Law, Modernity (= HIS 324)


    Instructor
    Boyer, Tilburg

    This course, team-taught by a historian of European gender and a legal and literary scholar of the Hispanic world, will introduce students to the ways that early modern and modern Western societies have intervened in and defined categories of illicit sexual desire, identity, and conduct. Modern European states took an abiding interest in regulating what they considered to be disordered and deviant sexual persons- the Homosexual, the Prostitute, the Intersexed. These same states took a marked interest in enforcing public health and hygiene by way of laws targeting private sexual behavior, from birth control to interracial relationships. These interventions expressed sharp anxieties about the character of modern life: urbanization, industrialization, democratization, the rise of the middle classes, empire. The course will combine an interrogation of primary texts from the early modern and modern periods with secondary and theoretical works dealing with history, law, and sexuality.

    Satisfies a major requirement in History

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.  Only counted in one track.

    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies  Only counted in one track.

    Satisfies a distribution requirement in Historical Thought

  
  • GSS 325 - Production Dramaturgy (=THE 325)


    Instructor
    Green

    This course is an examination of the art, craft, and practice of production dramaturgy. Students will learn how to bring research, script analysis, and interpretation into the theatrical process to support a theatre production’s creative team. Focusing specifically on production dramaturgy, students will gain experience creating materials typically delegated to a production dramaturg.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Theatre
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Theatre
    Satisifes Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement

  
  • GSS 340 - Transnational Sexualities Studies


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    This course surveys a number of emerging frameworks for rethinking the concept of queerness from a transnational perspective. Our investigations will move between theory and lived experience, within and across national borders, and will challenge key Western assumptions about sexual development, freedom, identity, and citizenship. We will consider questions such as: To what extent do Western paradigms of sex, gender, and sexuality limit our understanding of non-Western sexual cultures? How does the relationship between sexual practice and sexual identity shift across cultures? How do tourists and migrants negotiate, adapt, and remake sexual discourses and economies as they move in and through new spaces? How has the legacy of colonialism shaped and been shaped by sexual practice? How is sexuality used to articulate national, racial, class, and ethnic identities?

    Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 341 - Race, Gender & Sexuality in Asian American Literature and Film


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course introduces critical race theory and issues of gender and sexuality specific to Asian American context, using literature, film and media, and art and performance. We will explore problems of identity and citizenship, class and labor history, model minority discourse, sexual politics as well as intersection of gender and Asianness, and locate ways in which contemporary Asian America literature and film respond to these issues: how they critique and reinvent traditional ideas about Asian American culture. Furthermore, this course will pay special attention to transnational discourses (e.g. history of immigration, generational conflicts, border-defying transnational experiences and questioning the problematic “national identity”) within Asian American experience, and how gender and sexuality intersect with such discourses. The notions of power, nation, and citizenship in relationship to gender and sexuality are important in this course as we will be asking how gender-conscious and queer Asian American cultural productions may intercept the traditional US thinking on citizenship and racial differences, particularly at this time in our national history. Finally, this course will have a film/media focus, which means we will learn intellectual ways to analyze and discuss Asian American film works, and consider dynamic ways in which minority discourses can be productively deployed in art, film, media, and performance activism. The course content will encompass different Asian American experience, including South Asian, East Asian, and Southeast Asian American narratives.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies Major and Minor. (Literary and Cultural Representations Track)
    Satisfies a Diversity requirement in the English Major and Minor.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.
    Satisfies a requirement in the East Asian Studies Major and Interdisciplinary Minor.
    Satisfies a requirment in the Film and Media Studies interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, & Rhetoric requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 345 - Queer Immigration and Diaspora


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course will explore immigration, exile, and diaspora from the perspective of sexuality and queerness, with a focus on Latin American and Asian subjects. We will study basic theory of immigration, globalization, and queerness, and strive to understand problems of citizenship, politics of (not) belonging, affect of exclusion, and narratives of searching home. In order to develop skills of intellectual and critical analysis on the border issues and queer theory, this class will deploy the methods of transnational feminism, ethnic studies, and critical border studies. The course materials include: ethnography, political theory, documentaries and cutting edge works from the field of “immigration and sexuality.” Needless to say, this class takes an interdisciplinary approach and postcolonial perspective: course topics cover many different cultural and counter-cultural productions, articulation of power and resistance, theory of belonging and displacement. Furthermore, we will examine important key concepts to study immigration and sexuality, such as affect, intimacy, double identity, loss of citizenship, homonormativity, and inquire how various borders are being crossed while sexual (dis)identification becomes an opening for encounters. Through these works, we will question what it means today to be sexual, ethnic, and national minority simultaneously and how contemporary globalization and transnational economic activities affects ways we live and love.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 348 - Femme Theory and Performance


    Instructor
    Staff

    As an unconventional expression of gender identity and performance, this course will examine femme formations and cultural productions as a form of patriarchal-masculine resistance.  With its discursive origins in lesbian gender and social relations, the term femme has since evolved as an identity and critical practice of femininity beyond heteropatriarchal and binary logics of recognition.  Therefore, we will explore its conceptual use and implications by various communities and social movements, including but not limited to, gays and lesbians, feminists and queers of color, and transfeminists.  This course will then draw on literature from many of these knowledge paradigms as well as a variety of intellectual modes (art, media, music, dance, novels, etc.) and transnational contexts.

    Furthermore, we will employ femme as an analytical tool for assessing institutional, political, and social gender dominance at the nexus of race, sexuality, class, and nationality.  As such, we will take up the category of femme, to ask not only who is femme, but what does this concept, identity, and/or performance do within these relations? 

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Fall 2021: The course will mostly meet in person with designated days for online classes.

  
  • GSS 350 - Sex Radicals!


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    When we think about queer and feminist politics, we typically think of the processes by which women and LGBT people have effected change through legislation, court cases, and supporting candidates friendly to their causes. But much U.S. queer and feminist thought and activism has taken root outside the bounds of liberal electoral politics. This course centers on the fringes. It surveys the writings of less-palatable political actors: punks, anarchists, communists, anti-capitalists, sex workers, black radicals, and prison abolitionists. In exploring these political genealogies, we will ask: How does the personal constitute the political? What counts as (legitimate) political action according to whom? (How) can social change be effected outside of electoral politics and state institutions? What should be the role of the state in regulating labor and distributing rights and entitlements? What priorities have animated the various radical traditions within queer and feminist thought, and how have they addressed or failed to address race, class, ethnicity, and disability? How have these traditions intersected and diverged? Why have contemporary queer radicals come to focus on issues less obviously connected to gender and sexuality like global capitalism, drone warfare, and police militarization?

     

    Satisfies a requirement for the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.


  
  • GSS 355 - Femme Theory and Performance


    Instructor
    Staff

    As an unconventional expression of gender identity and performance, this course will examine femme formations and cultural productions as a form of patriarchal-masculine resistance.  With its discursive origins in lesbian gender and social relations, the term femme has since evolved as an identity and critical practice of femininity beyond heteropatriarchal and binary logics of recognition.  Therefore, we will explore its conceptual use and implications by various communities and social movements, including but not limited to, gays and lesbians, feminists and queers of color, and transfeminists.  This course will then draw on literature from many of these knowledge paradigms as well as a variety of intellectual modes (art, media, music, dance, novels, etc.) and transnational contexts. 

    Furthermore, we will employ femme as an analytical tool for assessing institutional, political, and social gender dominance at the nexus of race, sexuality, class, and nationality.  As such, we will take up the category of femme, to ask not only who is femme, but what does this concept, identity, and/or performance do within these relations?

    Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • GSS 360 - Transgender Studies


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    A political platform, identity, field of study, and more, “transgender” holds many different meanings for different people today.  This course explores the history and present of an expansive sense of trans- transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, and more- through an array of texts, including memoir, fiction, film, television, and scholarly writings.  By thinking trans in these different contexts and through different concepts, trans studies/politics connects to queer studies, explores and challenges “umbrella”-type understandings, and critically interrogates the inheritances that shape trans activisms today.  Topics that focus our work together include histories of sexology and activisms, disability and trans politics, trans people’s experiences with prisons and carceral violences, trans people’s participation and representation in larger projects for racial justice, environmental justice and trans activisms, and more.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor (society and politics track).
    Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.
     

  
  • GSS 370 - Global South Feminisms and Social Justice Movements


    Instructor
    Staff

    This course is about contemporary feminist movements in parts of the world that are often overlooked or labeled as “primitive”. With a particular, though not exclusive, focus on parts of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh), north Africa (Egypt, Tunisia, etc.,) and countries of the Persian Gulf (Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Yemen, etc.,), we will explore how women are social justice leaders in their daily lives, in individual and collective acts of resistance, in local communities as well as transnationally. We will examine some of the significant issues that poor women, women of color, racialized immigrant women, incarcerated women, confront and resist around the world. Rather than understand feminism as emanating from the “West” or the global north, this course focuses instead on what the “West” or the global north has yet to learn from feminist movements from other parts of the world. We will examine recent social movement histories, as well as considers contemporary social justice issues that impact, and are impacted by, multiple genders (with a particular though not exclusive focus on women and queer peoples), through various means of resistance and grassroots community organizing. These include organizing against reproductive rights abuses, globalization, and for immigrant, labor, and civil rights.

    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement
    Satisfies South Asian Studies minor requirement
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought Ways of Knowing requirement
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
     

  
  • GSS 390 - Sexuality and Public Discourses in the United States


    Instructor
    Hillard

    This course examines the history of sexuality in the United States from 1642 to the present through the lens of primary documents, analyzed using rhetorical methods.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought requirement.

  
  • GSS 394 - Latinx Sexual Dissidence and Guerilla Translation (=LAS 394)


    Please email Melissa Gonzalez (megonzalez@davidson.edu) if you are interested in this course.

    Instructor 
    González

    Despite local differences and sociocultural contexts, there are also remarkable convergences in subcultural minority activisms focused on liberation from intersecting oppressions related to sexuality, race, gender, ability, citizenship status, and class in North and South America. In this upper-level bilingual seminar, students will translate guerilla-style-functionally and in a non-literary fashion-texts by activists and cultural producers focused on intersectional sexual dissidence. Working in teams, students will have the opportunity to consult with some of their target texts’ authors, and the course’s final product will be an online archive of English and Spanish translations of texts related to intersectional, feminist, and queer Latinx American activisms and cultural productions. First, students will study the rhetorics and aesthetic strategies of feminist and queer activist collectives focused on social issues such as immigration, transgender rights, anti-racism, economic equality, anti-speciesim, body positivity, and prison abolition with a pro-pleasure, leftist perspective. Second, students in the course and I will elaborate a list of the principles and goals informing our functional, guerrilla translations. In the third unit, students will work exclusively on the translation projects they have been developing throughout the semester. They will have the opportunities to interview at least one of the authors whose work they are translating. Collectives, authors, and artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and the U.S. that we will study include: Colectivo Lemebel; Colectivo Universitario de la Disidencia Sexual (CUDS); TransLatina Coalition; Biblioteca Fragmentada; Lino Arruda; Constanzx Alvarez Castillo; Jorge Díaz; Valeria Flores; Daisy Hernández; Jennicet Gutiérrez; Claudia Rodríguez; Ignacio Rivera; Julio Salgado; and Susy Shock.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies
    Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Latin American Studies
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality and Community requirement
    Satisfies the Literary Thought, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Requires permission from the instructor.

  
  • GSS 401 - Television: Queer Representations (=ENG 409)


    Instructor
    Fackler

    With its roots in the gendered domestic suburban household, television has a longstanding investment in questions of gender and sexuality. Pushing back against the assumption that LGBTQ characters did not appear on our screens in a sustained way until the 1980s, this course will investigate how TV representations of queer life have changed with the evolution of the medium since the 1950s. Recent work in the field of queer TV studies has unearthed queer characters from previously invisible archives, charted changing conceptions of masculinity and femininity in broadcast programming, and documented the organizational strategies employed by television narrative that disclose and contain expressions of nonnormative sexualities. Indeed, in one of the foundational texts on queer TV, Lynne Joyrich argues that “U.S. television does not simply reflect an already closeted sexuality but actually helps organize sexuality as closeted.” Extending Joyrich’s line of reasoning, we will seek to understand the dynamics of visibility and invisibility that structure representations of televised queerness. How might we understand the contemporary series Transparent alongside or against the representation of a trans character on All in the Family (1975)? Why might The New Normal, a seemingly positive portrayal of new kinship structures, have failed as a series in 2013? Even as we watch the problematic take on villainous lesbian characters in the Angie Dickinson vehicle, Police Woman (“Flowers of Evil,” 1974), we will move beyond diagnoses and critiques of “bad” versus “good” queer representations to acknowledge the pleasures that may attend the viewing of even ideologically corrupt programming. Which shows and episodes became lightening rods for desire despite their failure to produce fully realized queer characters? And what genealogy (or genealogies) of queer TV might take us from the groundbreaking episodes of Ellen (“The Puppy Episode”) and Roseanne (“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”) in the 1990s to the moment at which a Vanity Fair cover declared that with “Gay-per-view TV” shows like Will and Grace and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, prime time had “come out” (2003)? As we historicize such developments, we will consider the contributions of writer-producers and series creators such as Alan Ball and Ryan Murphy, and analyze a variety of programs from “quality television” to animation, from the sit-com to reality TV, and from sci-fi to the game show.

    Satisfies a major requirement in English
    Satisfies a minor requirement in English
    ​Fulfills the Diversity requirement in the English major.
    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Film and Media Studies
    Satisfies Digital and Screen Media major requirement.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality and Community requirement
     

  
  • GSS 402 - Seminar: Black Sexual Politics


    Instructor
    Staff

    Racism has long been permeated through ideologies of gender and sexuality.  However, historically, black political and social movements have often only marginally addressed issues of gender and sexuality.  Furthermore, in the post-Civil Rights era, many feminist and queer scholars of color have noted the evolving and increasing emphasis placed on gender and sexual differences to propagate “new” forms of racism.  Therefore, this course will explore the role and relationship of gender and sexuality in contemporary racism and anti-racist black politics.  This course will pay particular attention to black subjectivity, such as what bodies or embodiments are il/legitimized politically and to what effect? 

    Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement. 
    Satisfies Justice, Equality and Community requirement.
    Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

  
  • GSS 403 - Latinx Sexual Dissidence


    Instructor
    Gonzalez

    Latinx Sexual Dissidence

    Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • GSS 431 - The Science of Sex


    Instructor
    Staff

    Contemporary understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality are shaped by a long history of scientific work in fields as diverse as sexology, genetics, phrenology, eugenics, biology, and more. This course traces how these understandings shaped and were shaped by sex, gender, and sexuality. The course begins with early work in the field of feminist science studies, then turns to questions of taxonomy and difference before interrogating the role of nationalisms in sex-related sciences. The class also explores American eugenics, early work in sexology and the study of homosexuality, sex and the brain in the contemporary U.S., problems with sex differentiation, the role of sex in current ecological sciences, assisted reproductive technologies, posthuman bodies, and feminist interventions in technosciences.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

  
  • GSS 432 - Prison Abolition, Transformative Justice, and Queer/Feminist Practice


    Instructor
    Branson

    For those who belong to marginalized communities, there is often intimate knowledge that the so-called state “justice” system is really a system of punishment grounded in injustice. We can look to movements from these communities to learn alternatives to state discipline. To combat systemic abuses of power that perpetrate wide-scale violence based on gender/sexuality, racialization, income, and education, there is a two-pronged approach: abolition, on the one hand; and transformative “justice” or transformative relations, on the other hand. In this course, we will gain a foundation in the history of abolition-from the fight against slavery and the settler colonial project of the US to the current movement to end prisons and punishment that reproduce anti-black racism nationwide-as well as a foundation in theories and practices of transformative justice or relationships. In our survey of history, theory, and practice, we will focus in particular on gender and sexuality and how transformative justice has risen out of feminist and queer liberation movements. Transformative models of accountability are grounded in community building, developed out of the ways marginalized people have had to function outside of state apparatuses that don’t serve them. Therefore transformative justice is intimately tied to the dismantling of the power relations of cis-hetero-patriarchy and capitalism. In this course, we will read widely in the history of abolition and transformative justice, emphasizing the queer and feminist roots of these models. We will encounter the limitations and complexities of these efforts, and work together to collectively imagine a world where people are both irreplaceable and accountable.

    Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 435 - Brown, Black, and Blue: Queer of Color Critiques of Policing and Prisons


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    The United States incarcerates its citizens at a higher rate than any country on earth. Although it comprises only 5% of the world’s population, it is home to 25% of the world’s prisoners-a population that is disproportionately black, Latino, transgender, and queer. This course begins by asking why and how racial, sexual, and gender minorities have historically been criminalized and targeted for state surveillance. We will explore the social framing of crime and criminality through examples like COINTELPRO, police raids on gay bars, the War on Drugs, the school-to-prison pipeline, the birth of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the prohibition of sex work, and the militarization of police forces. Finally, we will examine the burgeoning prison abolition movement led by queer and trans people of color and investigate alternatives to the carceral state such as restorative justice and community anti-violence projects. This course will be conducted entirely online with synchronous and asynchronous components and will feature regular guest visits from scholars, formerly incarcerated people, and community activists.

     

    Satisfies a requirement for the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

  
  • GSS 440 - Matters of Life and Death: Biopower, Necropolitics, Sex


    Instructor
    Horowitz

    In this course, we will investigate how definitions of life and death have evolved over the last two centuries and how those definitions have shaped American culture and policy. We will ask who is empowered to make decisions about who lives and who dies and by what authority; what bodies are included and excluded in discussions of bio- and necropolitics; and how gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and religion frame and become framed by matters of life and death.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

  
  • GSS 498 - GSS Senior Capstone


    Instructor
    Fackler, Horowitz, Kaufman

    Senior Capstone in Gender and Sexuality Studies


German

  
  • GER 101 - Elementary German I


    Instructor
    Denham

    For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Each course requires online work and participation in AT sessions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Fall)

  
  • GER 102 - Elementary German II


    Instructors
    McCarthy

    For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Each course requires online work and participation in AT sessions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 101 or placement.  

  
  • GER 103 - Intensive Elementary German (2 credits)


    Instructor
    Henke

    For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Requires online work and participation in AT sessions. Meets six class hours per week. [Equivalent to German 101 and 102, counting for two courses.]

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Spring)

  
  • GER 201 - Intermediate German


    Instructor
    Frazier-Rath
     
    Continuing work in developing language skills, with strong emphasis on speaking and writing. The course requires online work and participation in AT sessions.

    Fulfills the foreign language requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 102, 103, or placement. (Fall)

  
  • GER 231 - Special Literary Topic: Black German Art & Resistance (in trans.)


    Instructor
    Frazier-Rath

    Taught in English, this class explores contemporary literature, music, film, poetry, theater, and activism that has been written, created, performed, and enacted by Afro- and Black-Germans. Taking special care to center the voices and works of Afro- and Black-Germans and the work of BIPOC scholars, our topics will include (re)unification and (German) identity, memory culture, the politics of representation, East Germany, racisms, resistance and forms of activism, coalition- and solidarity-building, and more.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement.
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
     

  
  • GER 232 - Burning Books (in trans.)


    Instructor
    Henke

    Would the six million Jews have lived had the estimated 100 million books not been destroyed? What is it about books that suggests such a link to the human condition? Using the 1933 book burnings as its point of departure, this course explores the nature of literature in the context of the Third Reich. As you learn about Nazi Germany and the imaginary, and literary resistance to it, you will also be introduced to some basic methods of literary criticism. The end of the course is devoted to literary representations of the Holocaust.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Taught in English.

     

  
  • GER 240 - German for Economics and Policy


    Instructor
    Denham

    This advanced intermediate language course provides an introduction to the economic and political structures in Germany and the EU. Covered topics include the history and current state of the most important political structures (parties, governmental structures in Germany and Europe), economic structures (trade agreements, finance, corporate and business structures), the role of the press and political foundations and non-governmental think thanks, and the transatlantic relationship. The course involves case studies: small groups of students will coordinate with a local German (or Swiss or Austrian) company in the Charlotte region and do an in-depth study of the company in the context of the course; this involves on-site visits and interviews and networking with German business leaders. The course culminates with a student-designed Davidson German Business Forum: a symposium and poster session in which students present their case studies with the German business leaders present. The course offers intensive work in German in the course topics. Taught in German. Prerequisite: German 201 or the equivalent.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement in German Studies

    Satisfies a minor requirement in German Studies

    Fulfills the foreign language requirement

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Taught in German. German 201 or the equivalent.

     

  
  • GER 241 - Race, Gender, Migration (in trans.)


    Instructor
    Frazier-Rath

    Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss culture. Covers various aspects of culture and society, such as history, politics, economics, literature, film, art and architecture, music, and mass media. Sample topics include The Holocaust and Vienna at the Turn of the Century.

    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

     

  
  • GER 242 - Hollywood Alternatives, From Germany and Beyond (in trans.)


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    This course offers a sampling of historical and contemporary attempts to challenge Hollywood’s dominant cinematic codes. We will watch films from the Weimar Republic, “New German Cinema” of the 1970s, Russian montage, French New Wave, art house cinema of the 1960s, as well as feminist, Black, and queer films. Filmmakers include: F.W. Murnau, Maya Deren, Luis Bunuel, Jean-Luc Godard, Michelangelo Antonioni, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Michael Hanecke, Todd Haynes, Charles Burnett, Barry Jenkins, Chantel Akerman, Claire Denis, and Celine Sciamma. Students will write short essays and make their own short experimental films.

     

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

     

     

  
  • GER 243 - Special Topics in Film (in trans.)


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film that introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Classes focus on close readings and discussions.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Taught in English.
     

    GER 243 Gender in Film topic counts towards the Gender and Sexuality Studies major.

  
  • GER 250 - Introduction to German Literary Studies


    Instructor
    Denham

    An introduction to authors, genres, and periods in German literature as well as methods of literary criticism. Close reading, discussion, and analytical writing in German about key original texts from various periods and traditions.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 201 or placement. 

  
  • GER 251 - Special Literary Topics


    Instructor
    Staff

    Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include the Bildungsroman, crime fiction, Theory of Drama, Literature as Resistance, Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertolt Brecht.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 250 or permission of the instructor. 

  
  • GER 260 - Introduction to German Cultural Studies


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Close attention to the various answers to the questions: “Was ist Deutsch?” and “What does the study of German culture entail?” Texts drawn from various discourses, including history, literature, film, visual arts, political and social science, as well as journalism and popular culture.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 201 or placement. (Fall)

  
  • GER 261 - Special Cultural Topics


    Instructor
    Staff

    Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss culture. Covers various aspects of culture and society, such as history, politics, economics, literature, film, art and architecture, music, and mass media. Sample topics include German Mass Media, Terrorism in Germany, the Afro-German Experience.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 260 or permission of the instructor.
     

  
  • GER 263 - Special Topics in Film


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film which introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Sample topics include an overview of German cinema, as well as German popular film. Classes are taught in German and focus on close readings and discussions.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 201 or placement test.
     

  
  • GER 270 - Contemporary Germany


    Instructor
    Staff

    Examination of contemporary life in Germany. Texts include current newspapers and magazines, supplemented by video and film. Emphasis on composition and conversation. Strongly recommended for students planning to study in Germany.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 201 or placement.
     

  
  • GER 298 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student’s work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student’s accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor and the department chair. (Fall and Spring)

  
  • GER 307 - Advanced Grammar and Composition


    Instructor
    Henke

    Study of complex grammatical forms, combined with advanced work in written German. Suitable as preparation for the Goethe-Zertifikat B2.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 201 or above. (Fall)

  
  • GER 331 - Special Literary Topics (in trans.)


    Instructor
    Henke

    Focus on Uwe Johnson’s 1,700 page novel Anniversaries with attention to its literary and historical contexts. Open to students, alumni, faculty, and staff. Weekly reading and writing, presentations, research paper or creative project.

    Satisfies German Studies major and minor requirement.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
     

  
  • GER 332 - Modernism (in trans.)


    Instructor
    Denham

    An interdisciplinary study in English of modernist movements in Central Europe between 1890 and 1940. Topics covered include literary movements (Naturalism, Expressionism, New Realism); artistic movements (Blue Rider, the Bridge, Jugendstil, Neue Sachlichkeit, Bauhaus); music (Neo-Romanticism, Second Viennese School, Jazz); culture and politics (Freud, fascism, urbanism, film, anti-Semitism). Some key figures include: Kandinsky, Klee, Gropius, Rilke, Kafka, Luxemburg, Modersohn-Becker, Th. Mann, Musil, Döblin, Nietzsche, Lasker-Schüler, Hitler, Riefenstahl, Trakl, R. Strauss, Torberg, Jünger.

     

  
  • GER 336 - Memory on Film (in trans.)


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    In the wake of 2020’s racial reckonings, memory culture has expanded and gained contemporary relevance. This course will examine memory as a frequent theme in film, film as a form of memory, how filmic structures represent memory, and memory’s role in countering the official stories of history and nation. It will also include attention to visual artists, like Kehinde Wiley and Kara Walker, who represent U.S. racial history, German memory sites that document its turbulent 20th century history, and ongoing archiving of Covid-related experiences. Besides weekly film viewing, students will write short essays and create a larger memory project which can take written, filmic, or other kinds of creative form. This course may also include a post-semester research trip to Berlin.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

  
  • GER 341 - Art and Culture in the Third Reich (in Translation)


    Cultural Topics in Translation

    Topic: Art and Culture in the Third Reich

     

    Instructor
    Henke

    In translation.  Analysis of the state-controlled culture industry in Germany, 1933 to 1945; examination of its dominant art forms, including literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, music, dance, theatre, and industrial art.

    Provides credit for the German Studies major.
    Provides credit for the History major.
    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Taught in English

  
  • GER 342 - Cultural, Filmic and Digital Studies (taught in English)


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Cultural, Filmic and Digital Adaptations examines a variety of medium-specific transformations that occur across German and American culture. We will read adaptation theory, examine intercultural and intermedial manifestations of the adaptation process, and consider connections with translation studies. “Intertextuality” will also serve as a touchstone throughout, or multidirectional movements between source and adaption and art itself as dialogic in nature. Our material will include Weimar cinema as source for Hollywood noir films, web series like “Awkward Black Girl” as template for stories about multicultural creatives in Berlin, Grimm’s fairytales in video game format, and American horror films and westerns as inspiration for German arthouse cinema. Students will write analytic essays and complete one creative assignment that adapts a source in one medium to another.

    Satisfies German Studies major and minor requirement.
    Satisfies Film and Media Studies Interdisciplinary minor requirement.
    Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

  
  • GER 343 - Special Topics in Film (in trans.)


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film that introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Classes focus on close readings and discussions.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Taught in English.
     

  
  • GER 350 - Modernes Drama


    Instructors
    Henke

    Overview of modern German drama in the context of major developments in German, Swiss, and Austrian theater. Playwrights discussed include: Büchner, Brecht, Fleißer, Dürrenmatt, Frisch, Weiß, Bernhard, Tabori, Meinhof, and Jelinek. Taught in German.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 250 or permission of the instructor.
     

  
  • GER 351 - Special Literary Topics:


    Instructor
    Frazier-Rath

    Using the tools of Critical Race Studies, Postcolonial Feminist Thought, and Cultural Studies, this class explores the intersections and interconnectedness of concepts of race, gender, and citizenship/nationhood in Europe as they emerged (in new ways) in the 18th and 19th centuries, as they informed Nazi ideology and experiences of the Holocaust/Porajmos, and as people have responded to and rethought these relationships in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. This class is taught in German.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric requirement
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 260 or permission of the instructor. 

  
  • GER 352 - Special Historical Topic: Erinnerungskultur


    Spring 2021 Topic: Erinnerungskultur
    Instructor

    Frazier-Rath

    “Erinnerungskultur” is the German term for “remembrance culture” or “memory culture.” In this class, we will explore and analyze a variety of ways in which the past - particularly Germany’s tumultuous past - have been remembered. Using the tools of cultural studies, we will ask questions about the possibilities and limitations of representing the Holocaust, the Porajmos, and colonial violence in contemporary Germany. We will explore the ways that Germany’s past, present, and futures are intermingled, and how the ways the past is remembered has profound and often material effects, especially on vulnerable populations (e.g., refugees entering and living in Germany, Afro-German and Black people, Jewish communities, LGBTQIA folx, …) today. This class is taught in German.

    Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 260 or permission of the instructor. 

  
  • GER 354 - Contemporary German Literature


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Overview of German literature since 1989, with particular emphasis on prose fiction and popular literature. Authors discussed include: Günter Grass, Judith Hermann, Florian Illies, Daniel Kehlmann, and Juli Zeh, among others. Taught in German.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 250 or permission of the instructor.
     

  
  • GER 358 - Historical Fiction


    Instructor
    Henke

    Coming Soon!

  
  • GER 361 - Literary Topics: Imagining Berlin


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Although the “Berlin Republic” is more than twenty years old, journalistic assessments of the city emphasize its youthful energy and the start of a new era. Yet literary and filmic representations of Berlin offer a more variegated picture, one both celebratory and critical. This course aims to get beyond the official hype by looking at recent novels and films and how they: represent Berlin topography; call upon historical and ideological perspectives as well as individual and collective memory; depict everyday life and fantasies in a multicultural city; allude to historical and/or continued divisions between East and West. In the process students will encounter both concrete and imaginary conceptions of what one critic has called “the capital of the 20th century.” All readings, class discussions, and essays will be in German.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 250 or 260 or permission of the instructor.

  
  • GER 363 - Contemporary German Film & TV


    Instructor
    McCarthy

    Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film which introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Sample topics include an overview of German cinema, as well as German popular film. Classes are taught in German and focus on close readings and discussions.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 260 or permission of the instructor.
     

  
  • GER 370 - Advanced Grammar & Comp


    Instructor
    Henke

    Study of complex grammatical forms, combined with advanced work in written German. Suitable as preparation for the Goethe-Zertifikat B2.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 201 or above. (Fall)

  
  • GER 380 - Studies in German Language, Literature, Culture


    Instructors
    Staff

    Courses numbered 380-389 are taken abroad.

  
  • GER 398 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Henke

    For majors, minors, and other advanced students. Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student’s work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student’s accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor and the department chair. (Fall and Spring)

  
  • GER 430 - Seminars (in trans.)


    Instructor
    Staff

    Courses numbered 430-449 are seminars taught in translation. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

  
  • GER 433 - The Holocaust and Representation (=HIS 433)


    Spring 2019: This course is one of five interlinked Memory Studies Courses*

    Instructor 
    Denham

    History and historiography of the origins and execution of the Nazi genocide during World War II, with a focus on representations of the Holocaust and cultural memory practices in popular and public history, in the visual and performing arts and in literature, and especially in memorial structures and spaces.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • GER 438 - Seminar: Goethe, Schiller, Kleist


    Instructor
    Henke

    Introduction to the writings of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805), and Heinrich von Kleist (1777-1811)

  
  • GER 450 - Seminars


    Instructor
    Denham

    Courses numbered 450-479 are seminars taught in German. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 250 or permission of the instructor.

  
  • GER 458 - Historical Fiction


    Instructor
    Henke

    Courses numbered 450-479 are seminars taught in German. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    German 250 or permission of the instructor.

  
  • GER 460 - Film nach 1989


    Instructor
    Frazier-Rath

    This class, which could also be called Film nach der Wiedervereinigung, introduces students to German cinema since the fall of the wall, analyzing films in their various socio-historical and political contexts. We will explore topics like (re)unification, remembering the Holocaust, representing terrorism, Turkish-German film, transnational and international film reception and collaboration, representing and remembering East Germany, migration and “post-migrant” cinema, and the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship status on screen. This class is taught in German.

    Satisifes a major and minor requirement in German Studies.
     

  
  • GER 495 - Senior Colloquium


    Instructor
    Frazier-Rath

    In this course, we will focus on developing good writing habits and a positive relationship with writing in both German and English. We will establish a daily writing practice, set up accountability measures, and work in a collaborative manner. Students will apply what we learn to the writing and completion of a final research project or thesis, while simultaneously honing skills that will serve them in the future. In addition to weekly writing assignments, we will do extensive primary and secondary reading in both German and English on each other’s chosen research topics, ultimately also coming away with a deeper understanding of parts of culture and history pertaining to the German-speaking world.

    Satisfies German Studies major and minor requirement.

  
  • GER 498 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    For majors or minors. Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student’s work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student’s accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor and the department chair. (Fall and Spring)


Global Literary Theory

  
  • LIT 245 - The Enlightenment: Centers, Peripheries, & Legacies


    Instructor
    Ewington

    In his essay, “What is Enlightenment,” Foucault asks us to resist “the blackmail of the Enlightenment” - the widespread notion that we must take a side. Should we defend the Enlightenment as the birth of modern Western culture that bequeathed a legacy of liberty, human rights, democracy, and human progress, or condemn it as a pernicious era that gave rise to scientific racism and other dehumanizing ideas and structures? Rejecting this binary, Foucault invites us to approach the Enlightenment as its offspring, like it or not. Before embracing or rejecting, we must first study the Enlightenment to understand what it was and how it helped shape who we are and the world we inhabit, with all its promise and its horrors.
    This course offers an introduction to the Enlightenment through literary texts that popularized the movement across Europe in the eighteenth century. We will read canonical and peripheral primary and secondary texts that prompt questions related to justice, equality, and community. With Paris as our center and St. Petersburg as our periphery, we will also include non-geographic peripheries - authors marginalized by gender, creed, or race. 

    Over the course of the semester, we will discover that many familiar aspects of our lives have a distinct and not-so-distant history in the Enlightenment, including habits of cultural consumption; entire academic disciplines; assumptions about creativity, individuality, and private vs. public; discourses on progress, civilization, race, gender, and inequality; and the very notion of “critical thinking.”

     

    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, & Community requirement (JEC).
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, & Rhetoric requirement (LTRQ)
    Counts toward the Global Literary Theory major as one of the six literature courses on a specific period.
    Counts toward the Russian Studies major.
    Counts toward the Russian Language & Literature major.
    Counts toward the French & Francophone Studies major as one of the approved courses outside the department.
    Fulfills an elective for the English major and minor.
    Counts toward the Russian minor.
    Counts toward the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No knowledge of French or Russian required or expected. All readings and discussion in English

  
  • LIT 251 - Exile Literature


    Instructor
    Denham

    Study of authors and works of exile literature, including defining and challenging what exile literature is now, based on the definition grounded in the exile of writers from Nazi Germany. Major authors may include James Baldwin, Walter Benjamin, Paul Celan, Aimé Cesire, Eva Hoffman, Else Lasker-Schuler, Anna Seghers, Audre Lorde, Yoko Tawada, Friedrich Torberg, among others. Discussion, readings and weekly response papers to the group, collaborative projects, final research paper.

     

    Satisfies a major requirement in CIS - Global Literary Theory

    Satisfies a major requirement in German Studies

    Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory

    Satisfies a minor requirement in German Studies

    Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission required.

  
  • LIT 372 - Nabokov & Global Literature (=RUS 373)


    Instructor Utkin

    Vladimir Nabokov–brilliant writer, outrageous literary gamesman, and cosmopolitan exile–is a towering figure of twentieth-century literature. His most famous novel, Lolita, propelled him to international stardom and changed the transnational literary landscape. Child of a turbulent century, Nabokov wrote exquisite and at times disturbing prose in Russian and English, balancing between imaginary worlds and harsh realities. This seminar offers a sustained exploration of Nabokov’s major Russian and American writings as well as film adaptations of his Despair (Rainer Werner Fassbinder) and Lolita (Stanley Kubrick). In the second half of the seminar we turn to novels Nabokov haunts: Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran, J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace, Orhan Pamuk’s The Museum of Innocence, and W.G. Sebald’s The Emigrants. We will consider memory, exile, trauma, nostalgia, and identity as we read Nabokov, who saw existence as a “series of footnotes to a vast, obscure, unfinished masterpiece.” All readings and discussion in English.

     

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.  

    Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

  
  • LIT 432 - Theory and Practice of Literary Translation (Seminar)


    Instructors
    Jung, Denham

    This seminar addresses theoretical and practical aspects of literary translation, underscoring translation as both a distinctive form of creative writing and a demonstration of cross-cultural and linguistic competencies. Coursework includes regular literary translation, theoretical and historical readings, peer review, and a substantial final project and writing portfolio. The course explores translation across languages and cultures, but also issues of genre, adaptation, register, period, colonial and post-colonial literary and cultural relations, canonicity and innovation, for example.

    Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Chinese Language & Literature Major.
    Satisfies a requirement in the Russian Langauge and Literature Major.
    Counts as an elective in the German Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies Hispanic Studies manor and minor requirement(Spring 2023 only)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Intermediate competence (one course beyond 201) in at least one language besides English and prior satisfaction of the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.


Greek

  
  • GRE 103 - Intensive Ancient Greek


    Instructor
    Cheshire

    For beginners. No prior acquaintance with Greek assumed! Together, we’ll cover the whole of ancient Greek grammar, reading excerpts from Greek literature along the way. By the conclusion of the semester, you will be thoroughly prepared for GRE 201, which fulfills he college’s language requirement and serves as gateway to advanced courses in ancient Greek.

    Requires participation in AT sessions. Meets five days a week.
    [Equivalent to Greek 101 and 102, counting for two courses.]

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Offered annually, Spring only)

     

     

  
  • GRE 201 - Intermediate Greek


    Instructor 
    Cheshire

    This course fulfills the college’s language requirement and is your gateway to advanced Greek at Davidson. Together, we’ll review the language’s grammar by reading and discussing excerpts from a wide variety of prose and poetry (tragedy, comedy, history, rhetoric, epic, lyric, philosophy, hymn, bucolic, and the Christian New Testament), all the while exploring concepts such as semantics, pronunciation, and translation.

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    GRE 103 or placement test. (Offered annually. Fall only.)

  
  • GRE 211 - Greek Epic: Apollonius


    Instructor
    McClellan

    Apollonius’ Argonautica, the sole extant example of epic from the vibrant Greek Hellenistic Period, charts the tumultuous journey of Jason and the Argonauts to claim the legendary Golden Fleece from the far-off realm of Colchis, on the coast of the Black Sea. We will read Book 3 of the poem in Greek. Students will focus on developing reading skills and reviewing grammar, syntax, and meter. We will also investigate the poem’s socio-cultural contexts and the eclecticism of the Hellenistic Period. Finally, students will read the rest of the epic in English and explore Apollonius’ pivotal place in the larger Greco-Roman epic tradition. As the only complete epic poem written between Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Roman epic the Aeneid, the Argonautica is deeply indebted to its epic predecessors and an enormous influence on its successors. Consequently, a major goal of the course is to gain an understanding of the poem’s themes, style, and intertextuality to appreciate its place in the genre and how it was received in antiquity.

    This course is repeatable for credit.
    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Counts towards the Classical Languages and Literature major and as an elective for the Classical Studies major.
    Counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
    Satisfies Language requirement.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    GRE 201 or placement test. Students who have taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 311.   

    Not offered in 2023-2024

     

  
  • GRE 213 - Pindar’s Songs of Victory


    Instructor
    Cheshire

    This course focuses on verse celebrations by Pindar (c. 518 - c. 438 BCE) of victories in ancient Greek athletic contests such as the famous games at Olympia and Delphi. A rich trove of mythic lore, these commissioned songs for public performance participated in fascinating constructions of personal, civic, and ethnic identities while at the same time speaking more broadly to humanity’s relationship with the divine, our individual capacity for heroism greater than human, and the very real limitations our mortality imposes upon us.

    Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
    Counts towards the Classical Languages and Literature major and as an elective for the Classical Studies major.
    Counts toward the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
    Satisfies the Language requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    GRE 201. Students who have already taken a Greek course at the 200 level beyond 201 should enroll in GRE 316.

 

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