Jun 15, 2024  
2023-2024 Catalog 
    
2023-2024 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Mathematics

  
  • MAT 101 - Math for Human Flourishing


    Instructor
    Heyer

    A critical examination of mathematics as a vehicle for human flourishing. We consider how mathematics supports the pursuit of intellectual and moral virtues such as truth, beauty, and justice by feeding the human desire to explore, play, struggle, and create something permanent and powerful. Students will investigate the cultural history and social construction of mathematics as a discipline, how mathematics benefits society, and how it can be taught in ways that better reveal its human dimensions. 

    Satisfies Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

  
  • MAT 104 - Introduction to Statistics


    Instructor
    Bachmann

    An introduction to statistics as a science of understanding and analyzing data. Students will learn how to effectively make use of data in the face of uncertainty: how to collect data, how to analyze data, and how to use data to make inferences and conclusions about real world phenomena. 

    Satisfies Data Science minor requirement
    Satisfiest Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Not open to students with credit or concurrent registration in any college-level statistics course (e.g., BIO 240, ECO 204, MAT 105, MAT 341, POL 182, or SOC 201)  

  
  • MAT 105 - Introduction to Statistics


    Instructor
    Byers J.

    An introduction to statistics as a science of understanding and analyzing data. Students will learn how to effectively make use of data in the face of uncertainty: how to collect data, how to analyze data, and how to use data to make inferences and conclusions about real world phenomena. Students will practice their analytical and statistical skills while exploring topics related to social justice, equality, and community.

    Satisfies Data Science minor requirement
    Satisfiest Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement
    Satisfies Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Not open to students with credit or concurrent registration in any college-level statistics course (e.g., BIO 240, ECO 204, MAT 104, MAT 341, POL 182, or SOC 201)  

  
  • MAT 108 - Exploring Mathematical Ideas


    Instructor
    Duhon

    Survey of abstract mathematical ideas that deepen understanding of patterns from mathematics, art, and the physical world. Topics may include the nature of number, infinity, dimension, symmetries, alternate geometries, topology, chaos, fractals, probability and social choice. While techniques and concepts have much in common with advanced theoretical mathematics, little background is assumed and the course is not practical preparation for later courses in mathematics. The course title is occasionally changed to reflect a special emphasis.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Not open to students with credit for, or enrolled in, Mathematics 220, 230, or 255.

  
  • MAT 110 - Finite Mathematics


    Instructor
    Molinek, Chartier

    Mathematical techniques that have been used, productively and extensively, during the last thirty years and that do not involve the use of calculus. Probability, linear programming, matrix algebra, Markov chains, game theory, and graph theory are representative topics. Students learn to use computer software, including a spreadsheet, to solve problems.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Not open to students with credit for Mathematics 150, 220, or 340.

  
  • MAT 111 - Calculus I (for those with no previous exposure)


    Instructor
    Blake H

    An introduction to the differential and integral calculus of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions with applications including graphical analysis, optimization and numerical methods. 

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Not open to students with one semester of a high school or college course about calculus. (Fall)

  
  • MAT 112 - Calculus I and Modeling


    Instructor
    Duhon, Zhuang
     
    An introduction to the differential and integral calculus of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and applications including graphical analysis, optimization, and numerical methods. An emphasis on investigating mathematical approaches to describing and understanding change in the context of problems in the life sciences. 

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No exposure to calculus is expected

    Math 112 is not open for students with credit for Math 111

  
  • MAT 113 - Calculus II


    Instructor

    Chan

    An introduction to techniques and applications of integration; infinite series including convergence tests and Taylor series; calculus on parametric and polar curves; and concepts in 3-space including vectors, lines, planes, and vector-valued functions. Satisfies a major requirement in Mathematics.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 111 or 112 or equivalent preparation.

  
  • MAT 140 - Multivariable Calculus and Modeling


    Instructor
    Chartier

    Continued study of calculus and other mathematical methods for modeling change and uncertainty. Multivariable calculus topics include partial derivatives and the gradient vector, multivariate optimization, and double integrals. Matrix methods include systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, and eigenvalues. Models, primarily in the context of problems in the life sciences, make use of these methods and others chosen from systems of differential equations, difference equations, and discrete and continuous probability.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 111 or 112 or equivalent preparation.

    Not open to students with credit for MAT 150 or MAT 160.

  
  • MAT 150 - Linear Algebra


    Instructor
    Merriman


    An introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, and eigenvectors in an interactive learning environment provided by the computer algebra system Mathematica. Applications are chosen from linear programming, least squares approximation, graph theory, cryptography, computer graphics, and other topics. 

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 113 or placement above MAT 113

  
  • MAT 160 - Calculus III


    Instructor
    Wright

    A study of the differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables together with an introduction to vector calculus.  Topics include partial derivatives, directional derivatives, gradients, tangent planes to surfaces, double and triple integrals, change of variables in multiple integrals, vector fields, line integrals, Green’s Theorem, and surface integrals.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 113.

  
  • MAT 210 - Mathematical Modeling (=CSC 210)


    Instructor
    Chartier

    A survey of discrete mathematical and computational modeling techniques and their application to the natural and social sciences. Mathematical tools are selected from such topics as Monte Carlo simulation, queuing theory, Markov chains, optimization, discrete dynamical systems, computational geometry, agent-based modeling, and cellular automata. Emphasis is on formulating models, investigating them analytically and computationally, and communicating the results.

    Counts as an elective in the Mathematics major.
    Counts as an Applications elective in the Computer Science major.
    Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 140 or MAT 150, and one of CSC 120, CSC 121, CSC 200, or CSC 209.

  
  • MAT 220 - Discrete Structures (= CSC 220)


    Instructor
    H. Blake, J. Pulaj, H. Smith, Wiedenbeck

    (Cross-listed as CSC 220) 

    An introduction to proof techniques and discrete mathematics, with a focus on topics relevant to computer science, and an introduction to functional programming. Topics include logic, sets, functions, equivalence relations, algorithm analysis, methods of proof, essential combinatorics, recurrence relations, and discrete probability, as well as the essentials of functional programming. Additional topics may be selected from graph theory, number theory, or automata theory. This course prepares students for advanced work in both computer science and mathematics.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.
    Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
    Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 140, MAT 150, or MAT 160, and the ability to program in a high-level language such as Python, C++, or Java at the level expected in CSC 121 or an equivalent course.

  
  • MAT 230 - Sets and Proofs


    Instructor
    Blake


    An introduction to proof techniques (including quantifiers and induction), elementary set theory, abstract functions, infinite cardinalities, and properties of sets of real numbers; followed by an introduction to topics chosen from topology, analysis, dynamical systems, or set theory, among others.  Emphasis throughout is on developing abilities in writing proofs.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 150 or Mathematics 160  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • MAT 235 - Differential Equations


    Instructor
    Chartier

    A study of solution techniques and models in ordinary differential equations including first order equations, linear differential equations, series solutions, Laplace transform methods, and concepts of numerical and graphical techniques applied to equations and systems. 

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 150. (Fall)

  
  • MAT 255 - Number Theory


    Instructor
    Merriman
     

    Mathematical properties of the integers and related sets, including divisibility properties, prime numbers and their distribution, congruences, diophantine equations, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, and quadratic residues. Introduces methods of proof and emphasizes writing clear mathematical arguments.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 150 or Mathematics 160 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

  
  • MAT 281 - Models for Biological Structures


    Instructor
    Smith

    Over the last 15 years, modern biology has been transformed by the use of new mathematical methods. Many problems from gene regulatory networks, genomics, RNA folding, infectious disease modeling, phylogenetics, ecological networks, and food webs naturally lend themselves to discrete and algebraic models. In some cases, these models have even spawned new research areas. We will sample a variety of problems and modeling techniques throughout the class with a focus more on breadth than depth. The course will include the necessary biological foundation and cover the relevant mathematical theory.

    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 113 or MAT 140 or permission of instructor

  
  • MAT 315 - Numerical Analysis (= CSC 315)


    Instructor
    Heyer


    Survey of methods to approximate numerical solutions of problems in root-finding, differentiation, integration, curve-fitting, differential equations, and systems of equations. Derivations, limitations, and efficiency of different algorithms are considered. 

    Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
    Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MAT 150 and MAT 235, and proficiency in some programming language. (Spring)

  
  • MAT 320 - Combinatorics


    Instructor
    Zhuang

    The mathematics of arrangements of discrete sets, including binomial and multinomial coefficients, inclusion and exclusion, the pigeonhole principle, partitions and compositions, Stirling and Catalan numbers, occupancy problems, generating functions, recurrence relations, and selected modern topics.


    Counts as an elective in the Theory category of the Computer Science major.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC/MAT 220, MAT 230, or MAT 255

  
  • MAT 325 - Graph Theory


    Instructor
    Blake

    A rigorous introduction to graph theory including the study of trees, connectivity, graph distances, adjacency matrices, Euler tours, Hamiltonian cycles, matchings, graph colorings, planarity, Euler characteristic, directed graphs, network flows, algorithms and extremal problems.

    Counts as an elective in the Theory category of the Computer Science major.
    Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One of the following: MAT/CSC 220, MAT 230, MAT 255

  
  • MAT 330 - Real Analysis I


    Instructor
    Wright

    The theory of functions of a real variable. Topics include properties of the real numbers, sequences and series, continuity, differentiation, the Riemann integral, and sequences of functions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 113 and one of Mathematics 220, 230, or 255.  (Fall)

  
  • MAT 331 - Complex Analysis


    Instructor
    Chan

    The algebra and geometry of complex numbers, sequences and series of complex numbers, derivatives, and integrals of functions of a complex variable. The Cauchy-Goursat Theorem, the Cauchy Integral Formula and its consequences, Taylor series, classification of singularities, the Residue Theorem, Laurent series, harmonic functions, conformal mappings, and, if time permits, miscellaneous applications. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 160 and one of Mathematics 220, 230, or 255. (Spring)

  
  • MAT 340 - Probability


    Instructor
    Yerger C

    A study of probability theory relative to both discrete and continuous probability laws. Topics include independence and dependence, mean, variance and expectation, random variables, jointly distributed probability laws, Chebysheff’s Inequality and a version of the Central Limit Theorem. Applications of probability theory are approached through a variety of idealized problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 113, and either 140 or 160. (Fall)

  
  • MAT 341 - Mathematical Statistics


    Instructor
    C. Yerger

    A mathematical approach to statistical theory. Includes a study of distribution theory, important properties of estimators, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and selected topics from non-parametric statistics.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 340. (Spring)
     


     

  
  • MAT 355 - Abstract Algebra I


    Instructor
    Zhuang

    An introduction to the theory of groups, rings and fields. Topics include normal subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, Cayley’s theorem, permutation groups, ideals, the field of quotients of an integral domain, and polynomial rings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 150 and one of Mathematics 220, 230, or 255. (Fall)

  
  • MAT 360 - Topology


    Instructor
    D. Molinek

    An introduction to metric and topological spaces. Topics include concepts of completeness, compactness, connectedness, fixed point theorems, knot theory, and classification of surfaces. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One of Mathematics 220, 230, or 255. (Offered Spring of even-numbered years.)

  
  • MAT 364 - Computational Geometry (=CSC 364)


    Instructor
    Heyer

    Computational geometry bridges mathematics and computer science, combining algorithmic thinking and combinatorial reasoning to finite collections of points, lines, triangles, and other geometric objects. We will discuss The Art Gallery problem, convex hulls, triangulations, Voronoi diagrams, and applications such as computer graphics, animation, geographic information systems, 3-D printing, robotics, and graph drawing.  

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: CSC/MAT 220, or MAT 230 plus proficiency in a high-level programming language.

  
  • MAT 380 - Seminar in Problem Solving and History of Mathematics


    Instructor
    Ash

    Mathematics is a human construct and endeavor; as such, mathematics has its own culture and history.  One can ask many questions: Who does mathematics?  How and why is mathematics created?; How does mathematics influence and affect the world, and conversely, how does the world influence and affect mathematics?  Are there revolutions in mathematics?  In this course we will discuss many of these questions and more.  Beginning with mathematics in the ancient world we will do mathematics as it was down within a particular time period and particular culture.  We will then trace the migration of mathematical knowledge through various geographical regions: China, India, and Europe.  Finally, we will explore the development of some more modern mathematics.  In particular, ideas related to calculus, linear algebra, abstract algebra, and real analysis.

    This course will be delivered in a low residency format utilizing in-person meetings, synchronous sessions (students will meet in Studio D and the professor will have a digital presence), and asynchronous interactions through Moodle.  Please note there are no additional technological needs or cost incurred for this style of course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One of Mathematics 220, 230, 255 or permission of the instructor.

     

  
  • MAT 381 - Seminar


    Instructor
    Staff

    MAT 381-385
    Study of topics of interest in Mathematics. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.

  
  • MAT 382 - Knot Theory


    Instructor
    Wright

    An introduction to Knot Theory, a subfield of topology. Topics include Reidemeister’s Theorem, knot tabulation, and Seifert surfaces. We will discuss knot invariants including n-colorability, the Jones polynomial, crossing number, and unknotting number.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One of Mathematics 220, 230, or 255.

  
  • MAT 386 - Seminar


    Instructor
    Staff

    MAT 386-389
    Study of topics of interest in Mathematics. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.

  
  • MAT 391 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with permission of the department chair. Not eligible for math major credit.

  
  • MAT 395 - IS: Basketball Analytics


    Instructor
    Chartier 

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work. 

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with the permission of the department chair. Eligible for math major credit.

     

  
  • MAT 396 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with the permission of the department chair. Eligible for math major credit.

  
  • MAT 430 - Real Analysis II


    Instructor
    Staff

    Further development of the theory of real functions, including such topics as functions of several variables, metric spaces, function spaces, Riemann-Stieltjes integrals, and Lebesgue measure.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 160 and 330.

  
  • MAT 437 - Dynamical Systems


    Instructor
    Staff

    A study of the iteration of systems, typically arising from physical or biological models, and the resulting long term behavior. Periodic and chaotic dynamics as well as fractal graphics will be investigated.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 150 and 330 or permission of the instructor. (Offered Spring of odd numbered years.)

  
  • MAT 450 - Advanced Linear Algebra


    Instructor
    Zhuang

    A further study of vector spaces, dual spaces, inner product spaces, modules, linear transformations, characteristic roots, matrices, canonical forms, trace, transpose, determinants, normal transformations, and quadratic forms.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 355 or permission of the instructor.

  
  • MAT 455 - Abstract Algebra II


    Instructor
    Staff

    A continuation of Mathematics 355, including additional topics in group theory and ring theory, extension fields, straight-edge and compass constructions, Galois Theory, and solvability by radicals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mathematics 355.

  
  • MAT 481 - Seminar- Geometry and Art


    Instructor
    Molinek

    We study certain types and techniques in art (perspective, tiling, Escher-style prints as examples) and look at the mathematical underpinnings of that art type. We will make art and learn geometry (Euclidean, projective, and hyperbolic as examples) according to student interests. The course will be seminar style with students leading most of the discussion.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite is one of MAT 220, 230, or 255.

  
  • MAT 486 - Seminar


    Instructor
    Staff

    MAT 487-489
    Study of topics of interest in Mathematics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.

  
  • MAT 491 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Pulaj, Yerger, Zhuang

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with the permission of the department chair. Eligible for math major credit.

  
  • MAT 492 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with the permission of the department chair. Eligible for math major credit.

  
  • MAT 495 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with the permission of the department chair. Eligible for math major credit.

     

  
  • MAT 496 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students’ work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with the permission of the department chair. Eligible for math major credit.

     


Military Studies

  
  • MIL Labs - Leadership Labs


    All cadets attend leadership lab.  Time and place for leadership labs are at the discretion of the Professor of Military Science.  Leadership labs are normally scheduled for one 8-hour Friday lab per month.  Third and fourth year cadets participate in leadership labs with basic course cadets, as well as occasional advanced course focused labs as determined by the Professor of Military Science.  Leadership Labs reinforce classroom instruction and are focused as follows:

    MIL 101/2L -  BASIC LEADERSHIP LAB.  Students learn the basic fundamentals of being a member of a team.  This is taught through multiple venues including drill and ceremony, land navigation, weapons familiarization, basic rifle marksmanship, medical tasks, individual movement techniques, engaging targets, introduction to the orders process, understanding Army acronyms, hand and arm signals, and radio protocol procedures.  Freshmen learn basic leadership skills and master the fundamentals of being a follower.

    MIL 201/2L - INTERMEDIATE LEADERSHIP LAB.  Students become proficient in the basic fundamentals and are introduced to leading a small team.  This is taught through multiple venues including leading drill and ceremony, advanced land navigation, building terrain models, advanced rifle marksmanship, advanced medical skills, movement formations, movement techniques, special teams, writing operations orders, situation reporting, call for fire, and introduction to battle drills.  Sophomores focus on mentoring freshmen and serve as team leaders.

    MIL 301L - ADAPTIVE TACTICAL LEADERSHIP LAB.  Challenging scenarios related to small-unit tactical operations are used to develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills.  The cadet will receive systematic and specific feedback on leadership abilities.  Cadets at this level serve as the Noncommissioned Officer (NCO) Corps of the ROTC Battalion; they plan, rehearse, and lead basic course cadets through the program of instruction.  Juniors are the executors of the battalion.

    MIL 302L - LEADERSHIP IN CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS LAB.  Specific instruction is given in individual leader development, planning and execution of small-unit operations, individual and team development, and the Army as a career choice.  Prepares cadets for the mandatory 32-day Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) at Fort Knox, KY during the summer between their junior and senior academic years.  

    MIL 401L - DEVELOPING ADAPTIVE LEADERS LAB.  Cadets will lead cadets at lower levels.  Leadership experiences are designed to prepare them for their first military unit of assignment.  Identify responsibilities of key staff members, coordinate staff roles amongst twelve separate universities and colleges that make up the ROTC battalion, and use battalion field/garrison situations to teach, train, and develop subordinates.  Seniors are the battalion’s staff, primary supervisors and planners, preparing to transition to Second Lieutenants.

    MIL 402L - LEADERSHIP IN A COMPLEX WORLD LAB.  A continuation of responsibilities listed in MIL 401L.  The leadership lab uses case studies, scenarios, and tactical vignettes to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as a commissioned officer in the United States Army.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    There is no military obligation incurred by taking MIL 101L, 102L, 201L or 202L. Open to all Davidson students.

  
  • MIL 101 - Introduction to the Army


    Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership.  Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, mental/physical resiliency, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession.  Includes instruction in map reading, land navigation, and customs and courtesies of the Army. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Participation in leadership lab is required.  There is no military obligation to take this course, open to all Davidson students. (Fall)

    Not for credit

  
  • MIL 102 - Foundations of Leadership


    Instructor
    Marecic

    Overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Students explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Includes instruction in basic tactics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Participation in leadership lab is required. There is no military obligation to take this course, open to all Davidson students. (Spring)

    Not for credit

  
  • MIL 201 - Leadership and Ethics


    Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework.  Students practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs.  Includes instruction in troop leading procedures, tactical movement, battle drills, and offensive and defensive operations. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MIL 101, which can be taken concurrently. Participation in leadership lab is required (various locations - transportation provided).  There is no military obligation to take this course, open to all Davidson students. (Fall) 

    Not for credit

  
  • MIL 202 - Army Doctrine and Decision Making


    Instructor
    Marecic

    Examines the challenges of leading teams in the complex operational environment. The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, route planning, defensive operations, navigational methods, and operations orders. Further study of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MIL 102, which may be taken concurrently. Participation in leadership lab is required (various locations - transportation provided). There is no military obligation to take this course. Open to all Davidson students. (Spring) 

    Not for credit

  
  • MIL 301 - Training Management and the War Fighting Functions


    Academically challenging course in which cadets study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, Officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the squad level.  At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating, and leading a 9-person squad in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom practical exercise, a leadership lab, or during a situational training exercise (STX) in a field environment.  Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC), which you will attend next summer at Ft Knox, KY.  You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes, values, and core leader competencies from your instructor, other ROTC cadre, and MSIV Cadets who will evaluate you using the ROTC leader development program (LDP) model. Includes instruction in squad operations, problem solving, and combat orders.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Completion of Basic Course requirements. Participation in leadership lab is required (various locations - transportation provided).  (Fall)

  
  • MIL 302 - Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations


    Instructor
    Marecic

    A continuation of MIL 301 in which cadets study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, Officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the patrol/platoon level.  At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating, and leading a 24-person patrol in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom practical exercise, a leadership lab, or during a situational training exercise (STX) in a field environment.  Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC), which you will attend next summer at Joint Base Lewis-McCord, WA.  You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes, values, and core leader competencies from your instructor, other ROTC cadre, and MSIV Cadets who will evaluate you using the ROTC leader development program (LDP) model. Includes instruction in platoon operations, stability and support operations, and garrison orders.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MIL 301 or consent of the Professor of Military Science. Participation in leadership lab is required (various locations - transportation provided).  (Spring)

    Not for credit

  
  • MIL 330 - American Military History


    Instructor
    Marecic

    A pre-commissioning requirement for ROTC cadets enrolled at Davidson College. The course is a survey of American Military History from the Colonial Period to the present day, with an emphasis on the evolving relationship between the United States Military and the American People.

  
  • MIL 401 - The Army Officer


    Instructor

    Marecic

     

    Transitions the focus of student learning from being trained, mentored, and evaluated as an MSIII Cadet to learning how to train, mentor, and evaluate underclass Cadets.  MSIV Cadets learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer and apply the military decision-making process, Army writing style, Army’s training management, and mission essential task list (METL) processes during weekly training meetings to plan, execute, and assess battalion training events.  Cadets learn to safely conduct training by understanding and employing the composite risk management process.  Cadets learn how to use the comprehensive soldier fitness (CSF) program to reduce and manage stress.  Includes instruction in code of conduct, rules of engagement, counseling, and evaluations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MIL 301 and 302. MIL 401 is currently only offered at UNC-Charlotte.  Participation in leadership lab is required.  Mandatory for all senior ROTC students. (Fall) 



     

     

  
  • MIL 402 - Company Grade Leadership


    Instructor
    Bertles, Budke

    Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the full spectrum operations (FSO). Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. Includes instruction in Army organization and modularity, the platoon command team, a battle analysis, and counterinsurgency operations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MIL 401. MIL 402 is currently only offered at UNC-Charlotte.  Participation in leadership lab is required.  Mandatory for all senior ROTC students. (Spring)


Music

  
  • MUS 008 - After Hours Vocal Jazz


    Instructor
    Berlin

    After Hours Vocal Jazz is a select student-led 12-member ensemble drawn from the Davidson College Chorale specializing in music for jazz vocal ensemble. In collaboration with the director of choral activities, students who participate in After Hours are provided opportunities in service through semester concerts and leadership through rehearsal direction, sectional instruction, ensemble administration, event planning, rehearsal accompanying, rehearsal conducting, and choral composition.

    Auditions are a part of the regular Davidson College Choirs auditions held during the first week of classes, followed by registration on the music webpage.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required.

  
  • MUS 009 - Collegium Musicum


    Instructor
    Berlin

    A select student-led 12-member ensemble, Collegium Musicum Early Music Group draws from Davidson College Chorale in the Music Department. Collegium specializes in music of the late Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque. In collaboration with the director of choral activities, students who participate in Collegium Musicum are provided opportunities in service through semester concerts, and leadership through rehearsal direction, sectional instruction, ensemble administration, event planning, rehearsal accompanying, rehearsal conducting, and choral composition.

    Auditions are a part of the regular Davidson College Choirs auditions held during the first week of classes, followed by registration on the music webpage.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required.

  
  • MUS 010 - Chamber Singers


    Instructor
    Berlin

    Chamber Singers is a mixed-voice ensemble for advanced singers or sight-readers interested in pursuing challenging repertoire in a chamber setting. It is this setting that will facilitate a student’s development into an advanced choral singer. Members are expected to be members of Chorale, with limited exceptions. 

    Auditions are a part of the regular Davidson College Choirs auditions held during the first week of classes, followed by registration on the music webpage.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required.

  
  • MUS 011 - Jazz Ensemble


    Instructor
    Brown

    The Jazz Ensemble is an auditioned “big band” of approximately 18 musicians. The group rehearses and performs throughout the year, with several events highlighting the schedule, including performances at the Town of Davidson’s Concerts on the Green, multiple concerts, and annual tours.

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester, followed by registration on the music webpage.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required.

  
  • MUS 012 - Symphony Orchestra


    Instructor
    Keith

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester.  After auditioning, students register on the music webpage.  Spring registration takes place during course preferences registration or regular drop/add.

    An auditioned ensemble of approximately 50 student musicians, the Symphony Orchestra performs a wide range of repertoire from the Baroque to the present. Less than five percent of the group is music majors, so the orchestra is an excellent place for students of all backgrounds to rehearse and perform in a collaborative atmosphere while honing their technical skills and broadening their musical knowledge and experience.

    The orchestra performs two to three concerts per semester, and annually features student concerto competition winners and guest soloists. The group also tours every year, with the Jazz Ensemble, during the week prior to the beginning of the spring semester.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required.

  
  • MUS 013 - Chorale


    Instructor
    Berlin

    Davidson College Chorale is the premier choral ensemble at Davidson. A highly select, auditioned choir comprised of students from various academic disciplines, they perform the standard choral repertoire as well as newly composed and commissioned choral literature. The Chorale tours annually and represents Davidson College on the campus, regionally, and nationally.

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester, followed by registration on the music webpage.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required.

  
  • MUS 014 - Opera Workshop


    Instructor
    Lubitsch

    Auditions take place the first week of Spring semester.  After auditioning, students register on the music webpage.

    A course designed to acquaint students with the performance practice of a variety of opera genres through the experiences of study, rehearsal, and performance.  The culmination of the course is a performance of opera scenes as well as fully staged productions accompanied by piano.  Ability to sing in a foreign language may be necessary.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of director required. (Spring)

  
  • MUS 017 - Saxophone Quartet


    Instructor
    Brown

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester.  After auditioning, students register on the music webpage.  Spring registration takes place during course preferences registration or regular drop/add.

    A small group ensemble for saxophonists interested in performing chamber music ranging from Bach transcriptions to modern day saxophone compositions.

    The ensemble rehearses weekly and performs throughout the year.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

     

  
  • MUS 018 - Jazz Combo


    Instructor
    Brown

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester.  After auditioning, students register on the music webpage.  Spring registration takes place during course preferences registration or regular drop/add.

    This intimate ensemble is for instrumentalists interested in performing small group jazz literature while placing a strong emphasis on jazz improvisation.

    The ensemble rehearses weekly and performs throughout the year including on-campus functions and recitals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • MUS 019 - Chamber Music


    Instructor
    Meyer

    Selection of applied students takes place the first three weeks of each semester.  Contact instructor directly.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • MUS 020 - Jazz Improvisation


    Instructor
    Brown

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester.  After auditioning, students register on the music webpage.  Spring registration takes place during course preferences registration or regular drop/add.

    Learning to develop a jazz style through listening, transcribing, and soloing in a group context.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • MUS 021 - Appalachian Ensemble


    Instructor
    Singleton

    *Registration takes place during course preferences registration or regular drop/add.*

    Appalachian Ensemble involves learning the repertoire and techniques of the traditional music of the Appalachian region.  Old Time and bluegrass styles will be studied, with emphasis on fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, and bass.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required.

  
  • MUS 043 - African Drumming


    Instructor
    Sergel

    African Drumming involves learning techniques for the Djembe and Dundun drums of Guinea, Mali, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, and the Senegambia region of West Africa. Weekly sessions incorporate an oral tradition teaching style that includes drumming and cultural background information.

    No previous drumming experience is required.

    For more information, please contact director Al Sergel, at alsergel@davidson.edu.

  
  • MUS 050 - Vocal or Instrumental Study, 0.5 hour


    Instructor
    Staff

    Registration takes place on the music web page during course preferences registration or regular drop/add. 

    Applied instruction designed for students with or without previous vocal or instrumental training.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pass/Fail.  Additional Fee Info.

  
  • MUS 055 - Vocal or Instrumental Study, 1 hour


    Instructor
    Staff

    Registration takes place on the music web page during course preferences registration or regular drop/add. 

    Applied instruction designed for students with or without previous vocal or instrumental training.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pass/Fail.  Additional Fee Info

  
  • MUS 101 - Music Theory


    Instructor
    Botelho

    Introduction to music theory and analysis, with emphasis on intervals, modes, scales, rhythm, meter, and form.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Fall, Spring)

  
  • MUS 102 - Contemporary Music Theory


    Instructor
    Stasack

    Introduction to music theory and analysis through contemporary mainstream musical genres such as pop, rock, R & B, country, etc. Emphasis on intervals, scales, triads, basic tonal harmonic progressions, rhythm, meter, and form.

    Required course in music theory for the Music major or minor.
    Satisfies the Visual & Performing Arts requirement.
     

  
  • MUS 116 - Music: Sound with Impact (=PHY 116)


    Instructor
    Boye

    Scientific principles applied to musical sound production, propagation, storage, detection, and perception. Students will work individually and in teams to analyze and appreciate diverse world music styles, create and play instruments, and examine current practices in live performance. Class meets for 1 hour 3 times/week in a combined discussion/presentation setting and 3 hours of laboratory activity per week.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Experimental Physics minor.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Music major and minor.
    Satisfies the Natural Science requirement.
    Does not count for credit in the Physics major.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Who Should Take This Class?  This class welcomes all Davidson students, especially first- and second-year students that have not yet chosen a major, non-science major students, and anyone who loves music. There are no math or science prerequisites, and no prior experience in physics is expected. Of course, we will need to use math - at the level of high school algebra and trigonometry - in this course. The creative and open-ended nature of the labs and final project will give all students the opportunity to work at an appropriate and rewarding level consistent with relevant STEM preparation. Students of all cultures, backgrounds, and abilities are welcome, valued, and appreciated in this class.

  
  • MUS 121 - Music in Western Civilization


    Instructor
    Botelho

    Designed for students who have had but slight contact with the art. Works of important masters from all periods. Develops wider understanding of music through intelligent listening.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. 

  
  • MUS 122 - Music of the United States


    Instructor
    Lerner

    The cultivated and vernacular traditions of U.S. music from the Colonial period to the present. Focus on close listening and cultural trends. Topics include: parlor song, minstrelsy, Tin Pan Alley, ragtime, blues, jazz, modernism, country, rock, postmodernism.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Spring)

  
  • MUS 141 - World Musics


    Instructor
    Stasack

    Exploration of selected musical systems of the world, approached through study of their basic stylistic elements. Discussion centers on the music and instruments indigenous to each system and includes extra-musical cultural associations such as religion and theatre. Listening drawn from field and studio recordings of indigenous performers.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Fall, Spring)

     

  
  • MUS 142 - African-American Music


    Instructor
    Pyle

    Charts the development of the distinctly American styles produced by the combination of African and European characteristics.  The music is approached from a historical standpoint, beginning with the musical forms, styles and instruments in African and ending with current trends in the music of both cultures, and also from the standpoint of appreciation through educated listening.  Music to be studied include slave songs, gospel, blues, jazz, and rap.

    Satisfies Africana Studies major requirement
    Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts requirement


  
  • MUS 155 - Applied Music


    Instructor
    Keith

    Auditions take place the first week of Fall semester.  After auditioning, students register on the music webpage.  Spring registration takes place during course preferences registration or regular drop/add.


    Applied instruction designed for students with previous vocal or instrumental training.  Ability to read music is required.  Must successfully complete jury at end of each semester of study. See instructor for competency levels and literature requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor required. One credit for two consecutive semesters. Can be repeated for credit. Additional Fee Info

  
  • MUS 195 - Independent Study


    Instructor
    Staff

    Independent study in music under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic, and determines the means of evaluation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to qualified students with permission of the chair.

  
  • MUS 201 - Harmony


    Instructor
    Botelho

    Introduction to the grammar of tonal music through part-writing and analysis. Includes scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, and their inversions. Ear training in intervals, chords, melody, and rhythm.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required.

  
  • MUS 221 - Studies of Composers & Styles: Theft & Creativity


    Instructor
    Lerner

    This course will consider a diverse variety of musical styles by following how musical ideas get re-used.  Sometimes these re-uses are considered theft but other times they are regarded as an homage or borrowing.  Using as our central text a recent graphic novel written by law professors called Theft! A History of Music, this course will look at the issues surrounding musical borrowing, alluding, quoting, sampling, and stealing.  Poet and literary critic T.S. Eliot posited that “immature poets imitate; mature poets steal,” and a similar sentiment has been attributed to the composer Igor Stravinsky.  But is it really a question of maturity and artistic development?  Who gets to own music, and how?  What rights do creators have to use the music of others?  How has copyright law developed and how does it balance questions of freedom and control?  Our case studies will include works of jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, rap, and film music.
    No prerequisite.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Repeatable for credit.

  
  • MUS 222 - Varying topics in music history


    Courses concentrating upon specific varying topics in music history.

    Spring 2020

    Title:Studies of Composers and Styles:Women in Music

    Instructor
    Keith

    A study of music composed, performed, conducted, managed, and inspired by women. Through extensive listening, video screenings, readings, and discussion, this course will examine multiple case studies of women who have contributed to the development of music since the Middle Ages. Basic music concepts and history will be introduced in conjunction with each of the case studies. No previous background in music is required.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Repeatable for credit.

  
  • MUS 223 - Studies of Composers and Styles


    Instructor
    Staff

    Courses concentrating upon specific varying topics in music history.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Repeatable for credit.

  
  • MUS 224 - The Symphony


    Instructor
    B. Lawing

    History of the symphony and its literature from pre-classical examples to the present.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Normally offered in alternate years)

  
  • MUS 226 - Opera


    Instructor
    Pyle

    A study of prominent operas with a focus on production, reception, structures, historical context and significance. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Normally offered in alternate years.)

  
  • MUS 227 - History of the Orchestra


    Instructor
    Keith

    The social and institutional history of the orchestra in Western civilization from the Baroque to the present. 

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Normally offered in alternate years)

  
  • MUS 228 - Film Music


    Instructor
    Lerner

    Historical, stylistic, and analytic study of film music from the origins of cinema in the 1890s to the present, focusing on fictional Hollywood narratives while also considering music’s function in documentary and avant-garde filmmaking. Emphasizes close reading of music in relation to film, and vice versa. Weekly screenings.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. 

  
  • MUS 229 - American Culture of The 1950s


    Instructor
    Lerner

    A cultural analysis and history of America from the 1950s, informed by an interdisciplinary blend of texts and methodologies borrowed from musicology, literary analysis, film studies, art history, and cultural studies. While the primary emphasis will be on music (e.g., bebop, cool, rock & roll, modernism), close attention will also be given to visual art (e.g., Abstract Expressionism), literature (e.g., the Beats), and film.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    Music 122 or permission of instructor. (Normally offered in alternate years)

  
  • MUS 232 - Jazz


    Instructor
    B. Lawing

    A general introduction to jazz. The class will explore the roots of jazz, will critically examine jazz improvisation, and will present a history of jazz from its beginnings to the present.
     

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required.
    (Normally offered in fall of alternate years.)

  
  • MUS 233 - American Musical Theatre


    Instructor
    B. Lawing

    An introduction to the history and literature of the Broadway musical. Greatest emphasis is placed on the period beginning with Oklahoma! and continuing to the present.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 
    Satisfies Dance minor requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Normally offered in alternate years)

  
  • MUS 234 - Music of the Southern Appalachians


    Instructor
    Lawing

    An exploration of the vocal and instrumental traditions of the Southern Appalachians, with emphasis upon traditions of Madison County, Wilkes County, and Surry County, NC. Focus will be upon unaccompanied ballads and tunes for fiddle and banjo. Activities will include performance, field recording, historical research and festival attendance.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. (Spring)

  
  • MUS 235 - Special Topics in Music: Voicing Self


    Instructor
    Pyle

    What does your voice do? Why is it that you can recognize someone almost instantly from the sound of their voice? Is there such a thing as “black voice”? If so, what is it? How do different cultures and people use voice to navigate social, political, and cultural issues, particular issues of community and identity? These questions will propel our uncanny foray into investigating voice as both a medium and metaphor, used for belonging to and critiquing systems of oppression. This course will be a broad overview of the ways in which voice intersects with race, gender, and sexuality. We will address the role of the voice in a broad range of genres and musical styles including queer lip-synching, “sonic blackness,” gospel worship, beat boxing, auto-tune, throat singing, and eunuchs. As we navigate these domains, we will address topics of authenticity, appropriation, voices of technology, and identity.  

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required.

  
  • MUS 236 - Afrofuturism


    Instructor
    Pyle

    What can music offer a group of people who have been symbolically annihilated in practically every facet of life? In the Cold War era, dominated and framed by the Space Race, framed by utopic images of a post-human world (think of the Jetsons), the absence of black representation was profound. It underlined a white utopia that eradicated the physical bodies of black humans. Scientific and creative outlets were imagining futures seemingly unthinkable in their advancement-living side-by-side with robots, partaking in time travel, flying cars-yet the racial imagination was still strained. We will discuss the conditions of possibility or the conditions of necessity for the emergence of Afrofuturism, decode some of its far out and psychedelic word play and symbology, and we will discuss the influences Afrofuturism has had on the present. Our discussion of Afrofuturism will largely focus on the music, the “sonic fiction[s]” created by artists such as: Sun Ra and his Arkestra, George Clinton’s band Parliament-Funkadelic, LaBelle, Janelle Monáe and her android alter-ego Cindi Mayweather, and Drexciya and their underwater nation, among others. 

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement

  
  • MUS 237 - Minimalism/Postminimalism


    Instructor
    Lerner

    The aesthetic known as “minimalism” has been characterized in a number of ways, among them “repetitive,” “hypnotic,” “passionless,” “trance,” “stuck-record,” and “process.” A leading scholar of the style known as “minimalism,” musicologist Robert Fink has listed negative reactions to this music that include being “a kind of social pathology, as an aural sign that American audiences are primitive and uneducated…that kids nowadays just want to get stoned…that traditional Western cultural values have eroded in the liberal wake of the 1960s…that minimalist repetition is dangerously seductive propaganda, akin to Hitler’s speeches and advertising…and even that the commodity-fetishism of modern capitalism has fatally trapped the autonomous self in minimalist narcissism” (Repeating Ourselves: American Minimal Music as Cultural Practice, 2005). Emerging in the late 1960s and early 1970s, this style both borrowed from as well as influenced various popular musics (like disco and punk, among others) with its emphasis on steady pulses and repeating harmonic structures. In this course we will examine the various historical and cultural forces that led to minimalism’s appearance in the work of composers like Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and Philip Glass, but we will also give attention to figures who have previously been left out of minimalism’s historiography like Julius Eastman and Laurie Anderson. We will also get to later generations of minimalist and postminimalist composers like John Adams-whose 2005 opera Doctor Atomic told the story of Oppenheimer and the atomic bomb in a live theatrical setting as opposed to Christopher Nolan’s cinematic imagining of the same things-as well as to ways minimal style has existed in possibly unexpected places such as pinball, video games, and electronic dance music. We will read and listen and discuss and write about this music and its cultural significance. The course has no prerequisite but students registering for MUS 337 will be expected to have some experience with musical notation and theory.

  
  • MUS 241 - Music of Latin America (=MUS 341)


    Instructor
    Botelho

    (Cross-listed with MUS 341.)  An introduction to the music of Hispanic and Luso American countries and cultures from colonial times to the present.  Topics include: sacred and secular colonial music, son, marimba music, vieja guardia music, tonada, milonga, tango, Latin jazz, samba, and bossa nova.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
    Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and interdiscipilnary minor.
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. Music majors should register for MUS 341.
    (normally offered in alternate years.)

  
  • MUS 242 - Music of Asia


    Instructor
    Stasack

    Indigenous classical and folk music of China, Japan, Korea, and India. Includes vocal and instrumental music, as well as prominent dance and theatre forms. Considers aspects of musical systems, aesthetics, and performance practice. Emphasis on historical traditions.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. Normally offered in alternate years.

  
  • MUS 245 - Music in World Religions


    Instructor
    Stasack

    Cross-cultural study of musical styles, roles, and performance practices in religious belief systems and sacred rituals around the world. Thematic issues include: explicit and implicit relationships between musical substance and ideology; music as a tool for expressing, preserving, and empowering sacred texts; music as a means of structuring ritual; and the power of music to transform experience.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required. Normally offered in alternate years.

  
  • MUS 246 - Music of Brazil (=MUS 346)


    Instructor
    Botelho

    (Cross-listed with MUS 346.)  A survey of cultivated and vernacular traditions of Brazilian music from colonial times to the present. Topics include: sacred and secular colonial music, the barroco mineiro, nationalism, the avant-garde, samba, bossa nova, MPB, candomblé, jazz, tropical rock, and rap.

    Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
    Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and minor.
    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. 
    Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    No music training required.  Music majors should register for MUS 346
    (Fall; normally offered in alternate years.)

  
  • MUS 255 - Applied Music: Intermediate


    Instructor
    Keith

    Registration takes place on the music web page during course preferences registration or regular drop/add for Fall semester.

    Applied instruction designed for students with previous vocal or instrumental training. Must successfully complete jury at the end of each semester of study. See instructor for competency levels and literature requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Music 155 or permission of instructor.  One credit for two consecutive semesters. Can be repeated for credit. Additional Fee Info

  
  • MUS 261 - Introduction to Composition


    Instructor
    Stasack

    A course exploring the sounds and architectures of contemporary musical styles, while cultivating individual projects in composition, with opportunities for performance of works in recital.

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Music 101 or permission of instructor. (Normally offered in alternate years)

  
  • MUS 262 - Songwriting and Transcription


    Instructor
    Stasack

    Composition in popular song form and transcription techniques using current lead sheet format. Emphasis on developing aural perception and notational skills. 

    Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUS 101 or permission of instructor required. (Fall; normally offered in alternate years.)

 

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